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The Senate GOP tax bill gives most wealthy people substantial tax cuts — although plenty of other people will get tax cuts as well, especially in the early years. While this seems to be making the bill unpopular with the public, Republican senators are going all out to pass the bill this week anyway, desperate to get a legislative win.

Expand chart
Data: Tax Policy Center; Chart: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Why this matters: Focusing on the distribution of cuts lacks some nuance — Republicans say their tax bill will boost the economy — but only 25 percent of voters approve of the GOP tax plan, according to a recent Quinnipiac poll. And 59 percent of voters say the plan favors the wealthy at the expense of the middle class. These kind of approval numbers don't win elections, particularly following an equally unpopular health care bill.

Yes, but:

  • The bill could get more popular if it results in economic growth. "Tax cuts pass, economy grows, jobs grow, wages rise, voters will be happy. That's the hope," a senior Senate GOP aide said.
  • Tax reform and cuts are central to the GOP brand, and many Republicans truly believe this bill is good policy.
  • The stakes are extremely high. "They will melt down if they can't do this. Calls everywhere for [Mitch] McConnell to step down, [Steve] Bannon screaming about needing to replace leadership. Trump tweeting about low energy senators. It's their last stand," one GOP lobbyist told me.

Editor's Note: Sign up for Axios newsletters to get our smart brevity delivered to your inbox every morning.

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Go deeper

7 seconds ago - World

Microwave energy likely behind illnesses of American diplomats in Cuba and China

Personnel at the U.S. Embassy in Cuba in Havana in 2017, after the State Department announced plans to halve the embassy's staff following mysterious health problems affecting over 20 people associated with the U.S. embassy. Photo: Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images

A radiofrequency energy of radiation that includes microwaves likely caused American diplomats in China and Cuba to fall ill with neurological symptoms over the past four years, a report published Saturday finds.

Why it matters: The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's report doesn't attribute blame for the suspected attacks, but it notes there "was significant research in Russia/USSR into the effects of pulsed, rather than continuous wave [radiofrequency] exposures" and military personnel in "Eurasian communist countries" were exposed to non-thermal radiation.

Georgia governor declines Trump's request to help overturn election result

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp pushed back on Saturday after President Trump pressed him to help overturn the state's election results.

Driving the news: Trump asked the Republican governor over the phone Saturday to call a special legislative session aimed at overturning the presidential election results in Georgia, per the Washington Post. Kemp refused.