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Alex Brandon / AP

Senate Republicans didn't get a health care deal nailed down before leaving town — but they don't want to lose momentum, so they're going to send the Congressional Budget Office some broad outlines of a new bill to look at over the recess. If that sounds like an anticlimax, and you expected more, you haven't been watching Senate Republicans for the last two months.

Here's where things stand on the Senate's health care bill as we head into the sweet, sweet mercy of a weeklong recess.

  • GOP leaders plan to send at least an outline of a new version of the health care bill to the Congressional Budget Office by the end of the day, even if a deal hasn't been reached yet.
  • Senators were still all over the map yesterday on a handful of key provisions. The moderates are still worried about Medicaid and the conservatives are still angling for new regulatory carve-outs (more on that in a minute). So, whatever decisions leadership makes today probably won't fill in every detail.
  • But aides told Caitlin Owens they can send the broad strokes over to CBO now, and fill in the gaps later. They have to get the ball rolling today in order to have a score by the middle of July, and a vote before the August recess.
  • Per Jonathan Swan: The mood was somber at a Thursday afternoon meeting between HHS Secretary Tom Price and senior White House officials, and significantly more negative than the day before, per a source familiar with the meeting. In short: the moderate Republican senators aren't buying what Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is selling. At least not yet.

Here's what's on the table as leadership looks for a final deal:

  • As much as $45 billion to help fight the opioid crisis. But, for the most part, the senators clamoring for this funding are the same ones concerned about the bill's Medicaid cuts, and opioid funding alone might not be enough to win them over.
  • A new provision allowing people to use tax-preferred health savings accounts to pay their premiums.
  • A surprising number of Republicans seem totally cool with not repealing the ACA's tax increase on wealthy people's investment income, and using the revenue to fund more generous premium subsidies in the ACA's exchanges. The "repeal" bill looks more like the ACA every day.

Go deeper

Updated 1 min ago - Politics & Policy

President Joe Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Joe Biden sought to sooth a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

Updated 20 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden and Vice President Harris review readiness of military troops, a long-standing tradition to signify the peaceful transfer of power.

Updated 43 mins ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were inaugurated as president and vice president respectively in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Top Democrats and Republicans gathered for the peaceful transfer of power only two weeks after an unprecedented siege on the building by Trump supporters to disrupt certification of Biden's victory. Trump did not attend Wednesday's ceremony.

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