Harry Hamburg / AP

Senate Republican aides quickly shot down President Trump's tweet this morning, which said that if Senate Republicans can't pass their current health care bill, they should repeal the Affordable Care Act first and then replace it later.

  • "Not going to happen," said one senior GOP aide. "15 votes for that strategy. Which is why we are where we are."
  • Another senior GOP aide went further, saying if the president continues his erratic messaging, "Not really seeing anything happening in July if this keeps up."
  • And a third GOP aide said the chances of repealing first and replacing later are "zero."

What to watch: If anything, this tweet only bolsters conservative holdouts' case against the current Senate health care bill. Seeing the president back their preferred strategy could make conservatives like Sens. Rand Paul and Ben Sasse less likely to give their support to leadership's plan.

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49 mins ago - World

China bans Cruz and Rubio over Xinjiang criticism

Photos: Graeme Jennings/Pool/Getty Images; Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images

China said Monday that it will ban entry to Sens. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) over their criticisms of human rights abuses in Xinjiang, the AP reports.

The big picture: The move seems to be retaliatory after the U.S. announced sanctions on four Chinese officials for human rights abuses against Uighur Muslims and other ethnic minorities in the region last week.

Roger Stone says he plans to campaign for Trump

Roger Stone appears yesterday outside his home in Fort Lauderdale. Photo: Johnny Louis/Getty Images

Roger Stone told Axios in a phone interview that he plans to write and speak for President Trump's re-election now that Stone "won't die in a squalid hellhole of corona-19 virus."

"I'm asthmatic," said Stone, 67. "Sending me to a prison where I could not be socially distanced ... would, I think, be a death sentence."

Facebook's plan: Make nice, but don't give in

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Facebook last week took steadily intensifying heat from fleeing advertisers and boycott leaders and received a big thumbs-down from its own civil-rights auditors. Its response, essentially: We hear you, but we'll carry on.

The big picture: Early on in Facebook's rise, CEO Mark Zuckerberg learned to handle external challenges by offering limited concessions and soothing words, then charging forward without making fundamental changes.