Nov 12, 2019

Self-harm is rising among adolescents

Self-injury among teenagers is on the rise, especially among adolescent girls, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Habitual self harm is an indication of higher suicide risk for some people — and because it's considered a symptom rather than a standalone diagnosis, experts are struggling to respond.

By the numbers: About one in five adolescents say they've harmed themselves to reduce emotional pain at least once, according to a review of surveys taken in nearly a dozen countries.

  • For some people, self harm can become "a full-blown addiction, as powerful as an opiate habit," per NYT.

Go deeper: Why we're failing to stop teen suicide

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CDC: The jobs with the highest rates of suicide in the U.S.

Data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2018 analyzed suicide deaths among working-age Americans in 17 states to understand how different types of work influence a person's risk of killing oneself.

Why it matters: The CDC found that the suicide rate for people ages 16–64 years old rose 34% between 2000 and 2016, from 12.9 to 17.3 suicides per 100,000 workers. The federal agency also reported that suicide rates varied widely across occupational groups and that people involved in certain types of work, such as construction and extraction or production jobs, may be at a higher risk of suicide than other workers.

Go deeperArrowNov 17, 2019

Transportation Safety Board backs assessments for self-driving cars

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will recommend mandatory safety assessments for all self-driving cars before they can be tested on public roads, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: The NTSB on Tuesday said it intends to pinpoint the need for “safety risk management requirements for testing automated vehicles on public roads,” leading to the broader question of how autonomous vehicles are tested and how the U.S. government oversees that process.

Go deeperArrowNov 19, 2019

Study: Smartphone use spikes anxiety, depression in 25% of youth

Illustration: Axios Visuals/Sarah Grillo

Roughly 25% of youths experience depression, anxiety, poor sleep and high stress due to "problematic smartphone use," according to new research published Friday in BMC Psychiatry.

Why it matters: The report says that how young people use smartphones — in ways that mimic behavioral addiction — could be more harmful for mental health than the phones themselves.

Go deeperArrowNov 29, 2019