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A Yemeni child suffering from malnutrition receives care at a treatment center in Yemen on Thursday. (Essa Ahmed/AFP/Getty Images)

In a feature titled, "The Tragedy of Saudi Arabia's War," the New York Times published arresting photos of children in Yemen who are wasting away from hunger, as "the world's worst humanitarian crisis" continues to cause unimaginable suffering.

Why it matters: The death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul has triggered renewed scrutiny of the brutal war backed by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, which in recent weeks has caused UN officials to revise their predictions of Yemenis at risk of famine from 8 million to 14 million — or half the country's population.

1 unsettling quote: Ali Al-Hajaji is a father in the town of Hajjah in Yemen who has lost one son to starvation and fears losing a second — not because of a lack of food in the area, but because prices are rising so fast that he cannot afford to buy food. He told the Times:

"I can barely buy a piece of stale bread. That’s why my children are dying before my eyes."

The Times explains ... "Why We Are Publishing Haunting Photos of Emaciated Yemeni Children ... The images we have published out of Yemen may be as unsettling as anything we have used before":

  • "This is our job as journalists: to bear witness, to give voice to those who are otherwise abandoned, victimized and forgotten. And our correspondents and photographers will go to great lengths, often putting themselves in harm’s way, to do so."

Worthy of your time.

Editor's note: An earlier version of this story had included photos taken by The New York Times. Those photos have since been removed.

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Trump to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations before leaving office

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump plans to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations on his final full day in office Tuesday, sources familiar with the matter told Axios.

Why it matters: This is a continuation of the president's controversial December spree that saw full pardons granted to more than two dozen people — including former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, longtime associate Roger Stone and Charles Kushner, the father of Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

  • The pardons set to be issued before Trump exits the White House will be a mix of criminal justice ones and pardons for people connected to the president, the sources said.
  • CNN first reported this news.

Go deeper: Convicts turn to D.C. fixers for Trump pardons

Schumer's m(aj)ority checklist

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Capitalizing on the Georgia runoffs, achieving a 50-50 Senate and launching an impeachment trial are weighty to-dos for getting Joe Biden's administration up and running on Day One.

What to watch: A blend of ceremonies, hearings and legal timelines will come into play on Tuesday and Wednesday so Chuck Schumer can actually claim the Senate majority and propel the new president's agenda.

The dark new reality in Congress

National Guard troops keep watch at security fencing. Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

This is how bad things are for elected officials and others working in a post-insurrection Congress:

  • Rep. Norma Torres (D-Calif.) said she had a panic attack while grocery shopping back home.
  • Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) said police may also have to be at his constituent meetings.
  • Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) told a podcaster he brought a gun to his office on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6 because he anticipated trouble with the proceedings that day.