Ina Fried Mar 7
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Eaze grows policy team as it eyes cannabis delivery beyond California

A man and a woman enjoying a delivery from Eaze

Eaze, often called "Uber for Pot," has added 10 people to its policy team in the last month as it eyes expanding its marijuana delivery service beyond California. Its latest hire, Laurent Crenshaw, was just hired from Yelp.

Why it matters: The move comes as many states have legalized either medical or recreational cannabis use, but also amid signals from the federal government that it hopes to crack down.

Crenshaw, who will be senior director of policy, and responsible for overseeing efforts on the East Coast and with the federal government. While Eaze is looking to expand beyond California, no time frame has been set.

Among the other recent policy hires is David Mack, who joined about a month ago from Lyft to be Eaze's senior VP of public affairs and communications.

Despite the rhetoric from Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Mack said that "momentum is pretty good" on the regulatory front.

"There’s been a tremendous amount of interest from members on both sides of the aisle as well as (state) attorneys general to see clarity brought to this issue," he told Axios, pointing to a recent letter to Congressional leaders from several state attorneys general.

Haley Britzky 5 hours ago
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Zuckerberg happy to testify if it is "the right thing to do”

A portrait of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg
A portrait of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Jaap Arriens / NurPhoto via Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he would be "happy" to testify before Congress if it was "the right thing to do," in an interview with CNN's Laurie Segall.

Why it matters: Facebook has been under the microscope lately for what Zuckerberg called earlier today the "Cambridge Analytica situation." Zuckerberg said if he was the "person...who will have the most knowledge," then he'd be the one to testify in the face of Facebook's data-collection situation.

Bob Herman 3 hours ago
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Jamie Dimon's $141 million payday

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon speaks at an event.
JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon speaks at an event in 2016. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon took home more than $141 million in 2017 after calculating the actual realized value of his stock, according to a preliminary draft of the banking giant's annual proxy document. Dimon's compensation is calculated as $28.3 million when using the estimated fair value of his stock. But that compensation figure doesn't matter as much because it doesn't reflect what executives report in their personal income tax filings.

Why it matters: It's the highest pay package of any active corporate CEO from 2017, based on Securities and Exchange Commission documents that have been filed thus far. Dimon's compensation is also 1,818 times higher than what the average JPMorgan employee makes.