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Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images

With Facebook's announcing its Libra cryptocurrency, scammers have flocked to purchase domains that could easily be mistaken for legitimate Libra sites, say threat intelligence group Digital Shadows.

The big picture: Not all of the roughly 250 Libra and 100 Calibra sites that were registered within 24 hours of Facebook's June 18 announcement are scams.

  • "A lot of them are parked domains," said Digital Shadows' Harrison Van Riper, but the company has already found several sites deliberately trying to trick consumers into giving up cash.

Background: If regulators let Libra launch, Facebooks' entry into cryptocurrency will be released in 2020. The company will also offer a cryptocurrency holding service, known as a wallet, called Calibra.

Details: Digital Shadows has found several sites that copy the formatting of Facebook's own Libra site, sites selling access to the still unreleased cryptocurrency, and one that decided to give up midway through its scam. ("[S]orry Zuck. All funds are refunded," read a goodbye message.)

What they're saying: A Facebook spokesperson emailed: “We’re aware of the issue and will work with the Libra Association to take appropriate action.”

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A healthcare professional suits up to enter a COVID-19 patient's room in the ICU at Van Wert County Hospital in Ohio. Photo: Megan Jelinger/AFP

Utah doctors are doing what they say is the equivalent of rationing care. Intensive care beds in Minnesota are nearly full. And the country overall continues to break hospitalization records — all as millions of Americans travel to spend Thanksgiving with friends and family.

Why it matters: America's health care workers are exhausted, and the sickest coronavirus patients aren't receiving the kind of care that could make the difference between living and dying.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
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Southwest CEO: "You should fly"

The official guidance of the CDC says that "postponing travel and staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others this year."

  • Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly, however, took the opposing position when he was interviewed by "Axios on HBO." "You should fly," he told me, adding that "we need to have as much commerce and business and movement as is safe to do."

Cárdenas: Democrats need to be more "culturally competent" to win

Photo: Paul Morigi via Getty Images

Rep. Tony Cárdenas (D-Calif.), who's running for chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, told "Axios on HBO" that the DCCC needs to change "overnight" and his colleagues need to be more "culturally competent" if they want to be successful in the next election.

Why it matters: House Democrats are confronting what went wrong and what their party needs to change after they failed to expand their House majority and President Trump expanded his support among Latino voters.