Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir told Fox News' Bret Baier on Sunday that the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi was "a rogue operation" and "a terrible mistake," but argued that the relationship between the U.S. and Saudi Arabia will survive once an investigation is concluded.

The big picture: The Saudis' latest explanation is that Khashoggi died after a brawl broke out between him and security officials at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, and that it was carried out without the knowledge of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS). Lawmakers have largely dismissed this account as either unsatisfactory or false, while President Trump initially said he found the Saudis' story "credible."

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23 million Americans face eviction

Natasha Blunt of New Orleans, who is at risk of eviction. Photo: Dorthy Ray/AP

The coronavirus pandemic threatens America with a new wave of homelessness due to a cratering economy, expiring unemployment stimulus payments and vanishing renter protections.

What they're saying: "I've never seen this many people poised to lose their housing in such a short period of time," said Bill Faith of the Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio to AP.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 18,624,056 — Total deaths: 702,479 — Total recoveries — 11,181,518Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 4,802,275 — Total deaths: 157,551 — Total recoveries: 1,528,979 — Total tests: 58,239,438Map.
  3. 2020: Joe Biden will no longer travel to Milwaukee for Democratic convention.
  4. Public health: Florida surpasses 500,000 confirmed casesFauci calls U.S. coronavirus testing delays "totally unacceptable"
  5. Business: America's next housing crisis.
  6. Education: Chicago Public Schools to begin school year fully remote.
Updated 2 hours ago - World

Beirut explosion: Death toll rises to 135, officials under house arrest

Photo: Anwar Amro/AFP via Getty Images

The death toll from Tuesday's explosion in Beirut, Lebanon has now surpassed 130, including at least one U.S. citizen, amid a search for answers as to why a huge store of ammonium nitrate was left unsecured near the city's port for nearly seven years.

What we know: The government says around 5,000 people are injured. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said current indications are that the massive explosion was accidental, despite President Trump's puzzling claim on Tuesday evening that it appeared to be a bomb attack.