White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders confirmed that she was booted from The Red Hen, a restaurant in Lexington, Virginia, on Friday night — apparently because of her work for the Trump administration.

The big picture: No official word from the restaurant has been given regarding Sanders' dismissal from the establishment, though a waiter there posted on Facebook that "my owner asked her to leave." And Sanders isn't the first Trump administration official to have difficulty dining out in the D.C. area this week.

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen was heckled at MXDC, a Mexican restaurant in downtown Washington, earlier this week, while the administration was in the middle of a heated immigration fight. The next day, President Trump signed an executive order aimed to stop the separation of families at the border.

Senior adviser Stephen Miller was also heckled at Espita Mezcaleria, a Mexican restaurant in Washington's hip Shaw neighborhood, when a patron said, per the New York Post: "Hey look guys, whoever thought we’d be in a restaurant with a real-life fascist begging [for] money for new cages?"

One more thing: Young Trump staffers are also having a hard time dating in D.C., Politico Magazine writes.

  • One young woman said when she's on dating apps, "You do the small talk thing, and you have a very good conversation, and then they might say, 'You didn’t vote for Trump, right?' ... As soon as I say, 'Of course I did,' it just devolves into all-caps 'HOW COULD YOU BE SUCH A RACIST AND A BIGOT?' And 'You’re going to take away your own birth control.'"

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Ex-FDA chief: Pence campaigning after COVID exposure puts others at risk — Mark Meadows: "We are not going to control the pandemic"— COVID-19 looms over White House Halloween celebrations.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week — Fauci says maybe we should mandate masks if people don't wear themU.S. reports over 80,000 new cases for second consecutive day.
  3. World: Italy tightens restrictions Spain declares new state of emergency.

Amy Coney Barrett's immediate impact

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

In her first week on the job, Amy Coney Barrett may be deciding which votes to count in the presidential election. By her third week, she’ll be deciding the fate of the Affordable Care Act.

Where it stands: The Senate votes on Barrett’s nomination tomorrow. If she’s confirmed, Chief Justice John Roberts is expected to swear her in at the Supreme Court within hours, an administration official tells Axios.

Texas Democrats beg Biden to spend now

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The Biden campaign is rebuffing persistent pleas from Texas Democrats to spend at least $10 million in the Lone Star state, several people familiar with the talks tell Axios.

Why it matters: If Texas — which has 38 electoral votes and is steadily getting more blue, but hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1976 — flipped to the Biden column, it would be game over. But the RealClearPolitics polling average stubbornly hovers at +2.6 for Trump — and Team Biden appears more focused on closer targets.