Sen. Bernie Sanders apologized for allegations of sexual harassment and sexism lodged against his 2016 campaign, telling CNN's Anderson Cooper Wednesday night that if he runs for president in 2020, his team will "do better."

The big picture: The New York Times reported on Wednesday that a strategist on Sanders' 2016 campaign complained of sexual harassment by a campaign surrogate to her supervisor, Bill Velazquez, who made light of the allegations by saying she "would have liked it if he were younger." Sanders acknowledged that that the complaints were "not dealt with as effectively as possible," but said he was not aware of the allegations at the time: "I was a little bit busy running around the country trying to make the case."

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Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
1 min ago - Politics & Policy

TikTok beats Trump in court, ban won't take effect

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A federal court judge on Sunday granted TikTok's request for a temporary restraining order against a ban by the Trump administration.

Why it matters: American will be able to continue downloading one of the country's most popular social media and entertainment apps. At least for now.

Go deeper: WH pushes to uphold TikTok ban

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 32,949,407 — Total deaths: 995,658 — Total recoveries: 22,787,799Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 7,107,673 — Total deaths: 204,738 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 101,298,794Map.
  3. States: 3 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week — New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

NYT: Trump paid $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The New York Times has obtained more than two decades' worth of tax-return data from Trump and the companies that make up his business, writing in an explosive report that the documents "tell a story fundamentally different from the one [the president] has sold to the American public."

Why it matters: The Times' bombshell report, published less than seven weeks before the presidential election, lays bare much of the financial information Trump has long sought to keep secret — including allegations that he paid $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017, and has over $300 million in personal debt obligations coming due in the next four years.