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Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

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Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders said in an interview with "60 Minutes," to be aired Sunday evening, that he would, as president, be willing to meet with U.S. adversaries and use military force in response to "threats against the American people" and its allies.

Why it matters: Sanders is the current Democratic front-runner and enjoys broad support across nearly every demographic. However, one group that he is struggling to court is voters who prioritize foreign policy, which ranked as one of his least supportive blocs in the Nevada caucuses, according to Washington Post entrance polls.

The exchange:

SANDERS: "Hopefully, [military actions] are as rare as possible, but we have the best military in the world."
ANDERSON COOPER: "What would your criteria be for military actions?"
SANDERS: "Threats against the American people, to be sure. Threats against our allies. I believe in NATO. I believe that the United States, everything being equal, should be working with other countries in alliance, not doing it alone."
COOPER: "If China took military action against Taiwan?"
SANDERS: "I think we have got to make it clear to the countries around the world that we will not sit by and allow invasions to take place."

Details: Sanders said he believes meeting with adversaries is "not a bad thing to do," and that, like President Trump, he would be willing to meet with North Korea's leader Kim Jong-un.

  • "I think, unfortunately, Trump went into that meeting unprepared. I think it was a photo opportunity and did not have the kind of diplomatic work necessary to make it a success. But I do not have a problem with sitting down with adversaries all over the world," he said.

The big picture: Sanders has made common cause with leftists around the world for decades, sometimes controversially. But his foreign policy platform is not as radical as some might imagine, Axios' Dave Lawler reports.

  • Though he favors diplomacy over military action and believes the government should scale back its defense spending, Sanders also supports increasing foreign aid and reaffirming the United States' commitment to NATO.

Go deeper: Big foreign policy changes are coming if Trump loses

Go deeper

39 mins ago - Health

Biden says U.S. will have enough vaccines for 300 million adults by end of May

President Biden. Photo: Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images

President Biden on Tuesday said that ramped-up coronavirus vaccine production will provide enough doses for 300 million Americans by the end May.

Why it matters: That's two months sooner than Biden's previous promise of enough vaccines for all American adults by the end of July.

Updated 2 hours ago - Health

Texas to end all coronavirus restrictions

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaking at the White House in December 2020. Photo: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Texas will end its coronavirus restrictions next week with an upcoming executive order, Gov. Greg Abbott (R) announced Tuesday during a press conference in Lubbock.

Why it matters: After Abbott signs the new order, which rescinds previous orders, all businesses can open to 100% capacity and the statewide mask mandate will be over, though large parts of the state will remain under mask local ordinances.

Senate confirms Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo as commerce secretary

Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo (D). Photo: David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

The Senate voted 84-15 on Tuesday to confirm Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo to lead the Commerce Department.

Why it matters: The agency promotes U.S. industry, oversees the Census Bureau, plays a key role in the government's study of climate change through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and evaluates emerging technology through the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

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