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Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Hackers are using misspelled links in Rudy Giuliani's tweets to spread malware, CNET reports.

Why it matters: Giuliani, the former New York mayor and President Trump's personal lawyer, has more than 650,000 Twitter followers — including politicians, journalists and Trump Organization members — all of whom could unknowingly click an incorrect link that exposes them to malware.

How it works: Hackers or cyber trolls, using a technique called "typosquatting," register URLs similar to those of popular websites, hoping that users flub the spelling and visit the fake page, which can contain malicious software or unintended content.

What happened: Giuliani, who advised the Trump administration on cybersecurity, tried to tweet a link to his website, RudyGiulianics.com, on Feb. 16, but included a space after "Rudy."

  • He instead linked to a website that redirects visitors to websites that collect tracking data and leads users to an unsecured website attempting to install adware.
  • Giuliani again tried to link to his website on the same day but forgot the third "i" in his last name. This faulty URL did not contain malware but directed visitors to the Wikipedia entry for the Trump-Ukraine impeachment scandal.

The big picture: It's not the first time Giuliani has faced high-profile issues with technology.

  • He accidentally "butt-dialed" NBC News' Rich Schapiro last year. That incident prompted other reporters to discuss instances in which they received an accidental call from Giuliani.
  • He also visited a Apple Store in 2017 to have an employee unlock his iPhone after forgetting his passcode, reports NBC News. A former FBI special agent told NBC that Giuliani's decision to allow an unknown person to access his phone was "crazy."

Go deeper

Updated 12 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus may have been in U.S. in December 2019, study finds — Hospital crisis deepens as holiday season nears.
  2. Politics: Bipartisan group of senators unveil $908 billion COVID stimulus proposalFDA chief was called to West Wing to explain why agency hasn't moved faster on vaccine — The words that actually persuade people on the pandemic
  3. Vaccine: Moderna to file for FDA emergency use authorizationVaccinating rural America won't be easy — Being last in the vaccine queue is young people's next big COVID test.
  4. States: Cuomo orders emergency hospital protocols as New York's COVID capacity dwindles.
  5. World: European regulators to assess first COVID-19 vaccine by Dec. 29
  6. 🎧 Podcast: The state of play of the top vaccines.

Bipartisan group of senators unveils $908 billion COVID stimulus proposal

Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) in the Capitol in 2018. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

A bipartisan group of senators on Tuesday proposed a $908 billion coronavirus stimulus package, in one of the few concrete steps toward COVID relief made by Congress in several months.

Why it matters: Recent data shows that the economic recovery is floundering as coronavirus cases surge and hospitals threaten to be overwhelmed heading into what is likely to be a grim winter.

Inside Patch's new local newsletter platform

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Patch, the hyperlocal (and profitable) local digital news company, has built a new software platform called "Patch Labs" that lets local news reporters publish their own newsletters and websites, sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: It follows a growing trend of journalists going solo via newsletters at the national level.

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