Photo: Drew Angrer, Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) broke from his fellow conservatives on Tuesday, voting against President Trump's federal judge nominee, Michael J. Truncale, after he vilified former President Obama, calling him an "un-American imposter" in 2011, reports the Washington Post.

Why it matters: Romney was the only voting senator to break from the party line and
vote against the nomination. He has been one of the more vocal Republicans to come out against the president consistently since Trump entered the White House, commenting that Trump has "not risen to the mantle of the office," and in April, saying he was "sickened" by the findings of the Mueller report.

Details: Truncale was confirmed by the Senate by a 49-46 vote to the Eastern District of Texas, per the Washington Post. He claimed his comments about Obama were "merely expressing frustration by what I perceived as a lack of overt patriotism on behalf of President Obama," reports Politico.

"He made particularly disparaging comments about President Obama. And as the Republican nominee for president, I just couldn't subscribe to that in a federal judge. This was not a matter of qualifications or politics. This was something specifically to that issue as a former nominee of our party."
— Sen. Mitt Romney in an interview with Politico

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Updated 14 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Tim Scott says Trump "misspoke" when he told Proud Boys to "stand by"

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Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) told reporters on Wednesday that he believes President Trump "misspoke" when he told the far-right "Proud Boys" group to "stand back and stand by" in response to a question about condemning white supremacy at the first presidential debate.

Catch up quick: Moderator Chris Wallace asked Trump on Tuesday, "Are you willing, tonight, to condemn white supremacists and militia groups and to say that they need to stand down?" Trump asked who specifically he should condemn, and then responded, "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by. But I'll tell you what, somebody's got to do something about antifa and the left."

Updated 22 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Commission on Presidential Debates wants changes

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The Commission on Presidential Debates announced Wednesday that it plans to implement changes to rules for the remaining debates, after Tuesday night's head-to-head between Joe Biden and Donald Trump was practically incoherent for most of the night.

What they are saying: "Last night's debate made clear that additional structure should be added to the format of the remaining debates to ensure a more orderly discussion of the issues," the CPD said in a statement.

Trump says he doesn't know who Proud Boys are after telling them to "stand by"

President Trump told reporters on Wednesday that he doesn't know who the "Proud Boys" are, after saying at the presidential debate last night that the far-right group should "stand back and stand by" in response to a question asking him to condemn white supremacists.

Why it matters: The comments set off outrage and calls for clarification from a number of Republican senators. After being asked several times on Wednesday whether he will condemn white supremacy, Trump responded: "I have always denounced any form — any form of any of that, you have to denounce. But I also — Joe Biden has to say something about antifa."