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Photo: Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Trump associate Roger Stone has been ordered to report to prison by June 30, the AP reports.

The big picture: He will not be processed through a federal quarantine site, a part of the Bureau of Prisons' directives for newly sentenced inmates during the coronavirus pandemic, because he is voluntarily surrendering himself.

  • The quarantine-site policy is meant to slow the spread of the virus as nearly 5,000 federal inmates have tested positive and at least 60 have died.
  • Stone will instead quarantine at the still-unspecified prison for 14 days upon his surrender.
  • The policy of voluntary surrender, usually reserved for the well-off or famous, has drawn criticism from advocates who say it is racist.

Flashback: Stone was sentenced to 40 months in prison earlier this year on charges of obstruction of justice, lying to Congress and witness tampering.

Go deeper

Updated Aug 21, 2020 - Economy & Business

Timeline: The major developments in the college admissions scandal

Lori Loughlin leaves a Boston courthouse in August. Photo: John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

In what Department of Justice prosecutors have called the biggest admissions scam in U.S. history, parents allegedly bribed coaches and paid for forged standardized tests in a conspiracy to get their children into elite American colleges.

Driving the news: "Full House" actress Lori Loughlin, one of the biggest names ensnared in the scandal, pleaded guilty on Thursday to related charges and now faces two months in prison.

Biden taps Brian Deese to lead National Economic Council

Brian Deese (L) in 2015 with special envoy for climate change Todd Stern (C) and Secretary of State John Kerry (R). Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden announced Thursday that he has selected Brian Deese, a former Obama climate aide and head of sustainable investing at BlackRock, to serve as director of the National Economic Council.

Why it matters: The influential position does not require Senate confirmation, but Deese's time working for BlackRock, the world's largest asset manager and an investor in fossil fuels, has made him a target of criticism from progressives.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
25 mins ago - Economy & Business

The places regulation does not reach

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Financial regulation is not exactly simple anywhere in the world. But one country stands out for the sheer amount of complexity and confusion in its regulatory regime — the U.S.

Why it matters: Important companies fall through the cracks, largely unregulated, while others contend with a vast array of regulatory bodies, none of which are remotely predictable.