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Norma McCorvey testifies before a Senate subcommittee on the 25th anniversary of Roe v. Wade in 2003. She told the panel she believed the case was wrongly decided. Photo: Chris Kleponis/AFP via Getty Images

Norma McCorvey, the anonymous plaintiff in the 1973 Roe v. Wade case that protected women's abortion rights, told a documentary crew in a 2017 "deathbed confession" that she was paid to support the anti-abortion movement during the later years of her life, the Los Angeles Times reports.

What she said: "I was the big fish. I think it was a mutual thing. I took their money and they’d put me out in front of the cameras and tell me what to say. That’s what I’d say," McCovey told the makers of "AKA Jane Roe," which premieres Friday on FX.

  • "It was all an act. I did it well, too. I am a good actress."
  • "If a young woman wants to have an abortion, that’s no skin off my ass. That’s why they call it choice."

The big picture: McCorvey was never fully embraced by abortion-rights activists after she revealed herself to be the named Roe plaintiff in the 1980s due to inconsistencies in her account.

  • She claimed that her pregnancy that kicked off the case was a result of rape before later saying that she had lied.

The other side: Rob Schenck, an evangelical minister and former leader of anti-abortion rights group Operation Rescue, confirmed McCorvey's account, saying the group paid her out of fears "that she would go back to the other side."

  • "What we did with Norma was highly unethical. The jig is up," Schenck told the filmmakers.
  • "There were times I wondered: Is she playing us? And what I didn’t have the guts to say was, because I know damn well we were playing her."

Go deeper

Trump to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations before leaving office

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump plans to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations on his final full day in office Tuesday, sources familiar with the matter told Axios.

Why it matters: This is a continuation of the president's controversial December spree that saw full pardons granted to more than two dozen people — including former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, longtime associate Roger Stone and Charles Kushner, the father of Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

  • The pardons set to be issued before Trump exits the White House will be a mix of criminal justice ones and pardons for people connected to the president, the sources said.
  • CNN first reported this news.

Go deeper: Convicts turn to D.C. fixers for Trump pardons

Schumer's m(aj)ority checklist

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Capitalizing on the Georgia runoffs, achieving a 50-50 Senate and launching an impeachment trial are weighty to-dos for getting Joe Biden's administration up and running on Day One.

What to watch: A blend of ceremonies, hearings and legal timelines will come into play on Tuesday and Wednesday so Chuck Schumer can actually claim the Senate majority and propel the new president's agenda.

The dark new reality in Congress

National Guard troops keep watch at security fencing. Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

This is how bad things are for elected officials and others working in a post-insurrection Congress:

  • Rep. Norma Torres (D-Calif.) said she had a panic attack while grocery shopping back home.
  • Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) said police may also have to be at his constituent meetings.
  • Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) told a podcaster he brought a gun to his office on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6 because he anticipated trouble with the proceedings that day.