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National Security Advisor Robert O'Brien in Florida on July 10. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

National security adviser Robert O'Brien returned to the White House on Tuesday after recovering from a mild case of COVID-19, AP reports.

Why it matters: O'Brien was the closest official to President Trump to test positive for the coronavirus on July 27.

What they're saying: "He has been cleared by doctors after two negative tests for the virus, and has been asymptomatic for over a week,” National Security Council spokesman John Ullyot told AP.

  • Ullyot added that O’Brien’s return was consistent with advice from the White House medical unit and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Meanwhile: The White House announced Monday that randomized coronavirus testing for Trump's executive office staff would be put in place to protect everyone at the complex.

Go deeper: Trump claims coronavirus is "under control"

Go deeper

Ben Carson tests positive for coronavirus

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson tested positive for COVID-19, ABC News first reported on Monday.

Why it matters: Carson is the latest in a string of White House officials to contract the virus — days after Chief of Staff Mark Meadows also tested positive. Like Meadows, Carson attended the White House’s largely mask-free election night party last week alongside a group of other top officials in President Trump's Cabinet.

DOJ watchdog to probe whether officials sought to alter election results

Former President Donald Trump and former First Lady Melania Trump exit Air Force One in West Palm Beach, Florida, on Jan. 20. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department's inspector general will investigate whether any current or former DOJ officials "engaged in an improper attempt to have DOJ seek to alter the outcome" of the 2020 election, the agency announced Monday.

Driving the news: The investigation comes in the wake of a New York Times report that alleged that Jeffrey Clark, the head of DOJ's civil division, had plotted with President Trump to oust acting Attorney General Jeffery Rosen in a scheme to overturn the election results in Georgia.

1 hour ago - Podcasts

Google's chief health officer Karen DeSalvo on vaccinating America

Google on Monday became the latest Big Tech company to get involved with COVID-19 vaccinations. Not just by doing things like incorporating vaccination sites into its maps, but by helping to turn some of its offices and parking lots into vaccination sites.

Axios Re:Cap goes deeper into what Google is doing, and why now, with Dr. Karen DeSalvo, Google's chief health officer who previously worked at HHS and as health commissioner for New Orleans.