Sep 14, 2018

Mueller's strategy of silence

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

In an era where officials are leaking like never before, one team has consistently locked down information: special counsel Robert Mueller's office.

Why it matters: Mueller and his team have been the target of constant attacks from supporters of the president, but he has "special reason to be cautious," the New York Times reports, when even "the subtlest remark can be blown into a scandal" in the current political climate. And, his silence may be paying off — according to the Times, 55% of voters believe Mueller is "conducting a fair investigation."

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Biden and Trump are working out details for a call about coronavirus

Former Vice President Joe Biden after giving remarks about the coronavirus. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Joe Biden said during a virtual fundraiser on Thursday night that his staff is working with President Trump and his team to set up a call about the coronavirus and how he can help.

The state of play: "Yesterday, the Trump administration suggested I should call the president to offer my help," Biden said, chuckling. "Well, I’m happy to hear he’ll take my call; my team's working with him to set it up."

The month coronavirus shook the world

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It’s already hard to envision the world we lived in one month ago.

Flashback: A WHO report from March 1 shows a total of 7,169 coronavirus cases outside of China, with just seven countries having recorded even a single fatality and the total death toll under 3,000, including China.

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Coronavirus could hit developing countries hardest

Disinfecting in Dakar, Senegal. Photo: John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus is spreading most widely in countries that should be among the best equipped to handle it. There's no reason to expect that to remain the case.

Where things stand: 88% of new coronavirus cases confirmed on Wednesday came within the OECD club of wealthy nations, which together account for just 17% of the world's population. While that data is based on uneven and inadequate testing, Europe and North America are clearly in the eye of the storm.

Go deeperArrow34 mins ago - World