Axios Nov 5
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Ritz roundup in Riyadh

Saudi billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal in 2014 Photo: Majdi Mohammed / AP

"Saudi authorities detained a billionaire global investor and the head of the National Guard as part of an anti-corruption purge that consolidates Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's hold on power," per Reuters:

  • "Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, who owns investment firm Kingdom Holding 4280.SE, was among 11 princes, four ministers and tens of former ministers detained."
  • Why it matters: "Analysts said the goal of the purge went beyond corruption and aimed to remove potential opposition to Prince Mohammed as he pushes an ambitious and controversial reform agenda."

The $ part: "Some detainees were believed to be held at the opulent Ritz-Carlton hotel in the diplomatic quarter of Riyadh ... The hotel and an adjacent facility were the site of an international conference promoting Saudi Arabia as an investment destination last month."

  • AP: "Phone lines to the hotel have been cut off since Sunday morning. ... Marriott International said in a statement that it is currently evaluating the situation at the Ritz-Carlton in Riyadh. 'As a matter of guest privacy, we do not discuss the guests or groups with whom we do business or may be visitors of the hotel."
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What McCabe told Mueller

Photo: Pete Marovich / Getty Images

Andrew McCabe says President Trump asked him: “What was it like when your wife lost? ... So tell me, what was it like to lose?" McCabe — the former FBI deputy director who was fired Friday night, 26 hours short of being eligible for a full pension — says that in three or four interactions, President Trump was disparaging each time of his wife, Dr. Jill McCabe, a failed Virginia state Senate candidate in 2015. John Dowd, a Trump lawyer, told me: "I am told that the P never made that statement according to two others who were present."

The big picture: Axios has learned that McCabe has met with special counsel Robert Mueller, and has turned over Comey-style memos documenting his conversations with Trump. The memos include corroboration by McCabe of former FBI Director James Comey's account of his own firing by Trump.

Haley Britzky 6 hours ago
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Women and jihad: from bride to the front line

Suspected Al Qaeda-aligned Shabaab militants, a woman and her three children, sit next to weapons after their arrest on May 5, 2016 in Mogadishu
Suspected Al Qaeda-aligned Shabaab militants, a woman and her children, sit next to weapons after their arrest on May 5, 2016 in Mogadishu. Photo: Mohamed Abdiwahab / AFP / Getty Images

A women's magazine, unveiled in December, gives tips on how to be a "good bride" and make life easier for the man in your life. The twist: the magazine, "Beituki," is published by al-Qaeda as part of a propaganda campaign which "appears, in part, to be a reaction to Islamic State (IS), which has called women to the front lines," per the Economist.

The big picture: Extremist organizations are struggling to define what women's roles in their groups should be. While some force women to "remain indoors," as Beituki suggests, others have placed women on the front lines, or utilized them as recruiters.