Nov 4, 2018

The rise of white nationalism in America

Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Photo: Matthew Hatcher/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

For two decades, U.S. counterterrorism policy has focused almost entirely on combatting American and foreign-born jihadis, failing to recognize the growing threat of far-right extremism, writes Janet Reitman for the cover of next week's New York Times Magazine.

Why it matters: A string of domestic terrorism attacks has drawn new scrutiny to law enforcement's inability to squash the violent tendencies of the far-right — a crisis with roots that stretch back more than a decade, writes Reitman, who is working on a book about the rise of the far-right in post-9/11 America.

By the numbers: Far-right extremists have killed more people since 9/11 than any other category of domestic terrorism.

  • 71% of extremist-related deaths between 2008 and 2017 were committed by members of a far-right movement, while Islamic extremists were responsible for 26%, according to the Anti-Defamation League.
  • Between 2002 and 2017, the U.S. spent $2.8 trillion on counterterrorism. In that time frame, terrorist attacks by Muslim extremists killed 100 people in the U.S.
  • Between 2008 and 2017, meanwhile, domestic extremists killed 387 people.

The bottom line "These statistics belie the strident rhetoric around 'foreign-born' terrorists that the Trump administration has used to drive its anti-immigration agenda," per Reitman.

Worthy of your time.

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