Gates leaving federal court last year. Photo: Evelyn Hockstein for the Washington Post via Getty Images

Former Trump campaign aide Rick Gates was sentenced to 45 days in jail — to be served on weekends — on Tuesday in a Washington, D.C. federal court.

Why it matters: His sentencing wraps up one of the final outstanding portions of former special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation, which Gates cooperated with extensively.

  • Gates also received three years of probation and 300 hours of community service. He'll also have to pay a $20,000 fine.
  • Lawyers for the federal government also said during the hearing that Gates had agreed to cooperate with any ongoing investigations that go beyond his sentencing, per Politico's Darren Samuelsohn.

The big picture: Gates, a top associate of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, pleaded guilty last year to one count of conspiracy against the U.S. and one count of making false statements to the FBI and Mueller.

  • His cooperation delayed his sentencing. Following his plea, he faced 57 to 71 months in prison under federal guidelines.
  • However, Gates' attorneys filed a request last week for no prison time — instead seeking probation and community service — citing his "extraordinary assistance" in the Mueller probe, per the Washington Post.
  • Government attorneys didn't oppose that request, writing in Gates' sentencing recommendation that he "has worked earnestly to provide the government with everything it has asked of him and has fulfilled all obligations under his plea agreement."

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