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Reproduced from CivicScience; Chart: Axios Visuals

A new survey from CivicScience shows higher-income Americans are returning to dining and delivery at a higher rate than their less wealthy peers.

Why it matters: Wealthy Americans have a greater share of overall U.S. income than ever before and increased spending could be a boon to the restaurant and fast food sectors.

  • The richest quarter of Americans cut their consumer spending more than any other income group during the pandemic, according to a study by a team of Harvard University researchers.

Between the lines: While spending has rebounded over the last three months, that has been much truer for low-income households.

  • Spending among high-income households remains considerably lower than pre-coronavirus levels and appears connected to perceived pandemic health worries, the Harvard researchers found.

By the numbers: Wealthier people tend to eat the most fast food, according to a 2018 study from the CDC that found the percentage of adults who consumed fast food increases with family income.

  • 31.7% of adults in households at 130% of the federal poverty level ($31,590 for a family of four) or less reported eating fast food on any given day.
  • But 36.4% of Americans making 130% to 350% of the federal poverty level ($31,590 to $85,050 for a family of four) eat fast food on any given day.
  • And 42% of those making more than 350% of the federal poverty level eat fast food.

Go deeper

Chuck Grassley says he tested positive for COVID-19

Sen. Chuck Grassley. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Stringer

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) has tested positive for the coronavirus, adding Wednesday that he remains "symptom free."

Why it matters: Grassley is the second oldest member of the Senate at 87 years old, meaning he is at high risk for a severe infection, according to the CDC. The Iowa senator is the third in the line of succession to the presidency as president pro tempore of the Senate.

Updated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to coronavirus pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Azar says deadly Capitol siege could "tarnish" Trump administration's legacy — Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.