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Anthony Levandowski, then-head of Uber's self-driving program, speaks about their driverless car in San Francisco. Photo: Eric Risberg / AP

Uber is facing even more questions about its alleged attempts to interfere with a trade secrets theft lawsuit from Waymo after two ex-employees testified in court Tuesday. The testimonies were prompted by the discovery last week of a critical letter written on behalf of one of them, which led to a delay of the trial.

Why it matters: Uber's concealment of the letter likely spent whatever patience the presiding judge had left for the ride-hailing company. Moreover, the former employee, whose attorney drafted the letter in question, testified that Uber had a unit dedicated to gathering information and trade secrets from competitors overseas, and set up channels for untraceable communications. Still, the other employee's testimony as well as his denials of some claims in the letter also hint that this may not help Waymo's case after all.

Up next: The court will be making public a redacted version of the letter tomorrow, though the former employee has submitted a request that it be kept confidential. Angela Padilla, an in-house lawyer for Uber, will also testify tomorrow about the letter.

Go deeper

Biden embarks on a consequential presidency

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Donald Trump tried everything to delegitimize the rival who vanquished him. In reality, he's set Joe Biden on course to be a far more consequential U.S. president than he might otherwise have become.

The big picture: President Biden now confronts not just a pandemic, but massive political divisions and an assault on truth — and the aftermath of the assault on the Capitol two weeks ago that threatened democracy itself.

Updated 8 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Representatives from all branches of the military escort the 46th president to the White House.

Inaugural address: Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Biden sought to soothe a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

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