Acting DNI Joseph Maguire walks to a congressional briefing at the Capitol on Jan. 8 in D.C. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Retired Navy Admiral William McRaven, who oversaw the 2011 Navy SEAL raid that killed al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, defended former acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire in a Washington Post op-ed on Friday.

What he's saying: "...in this administration, good men and women don’t last long. Joe was dismissed for doing his job: overseeing the dissemination of intelligence to elected officials who needed that information to do their job," McRaven writes.

"Over the course of the past three years, I have watched good men and women, friends of mine, come and go in the Trump administration — all trying to do something — all trying to do their best. Jim Mattis, John Kelly, H.R. McMaster, Sue Gordon, Dan Coats and, now, Joe Maguire, who until this week was the acting director of national intelligence."
— William McRaven's Friday op-ed in the Post

Driving the news: President Trump confirmed on Wednesday that he will install Richard Grenell, the current U.S. ambassador to Germany and a staunch defender of the president, as the next acting director of national intelligence.

Go deeper: Trump to install loyalist Ric Grenell as acting intelligence chief

Go deeper

May 31, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Atlanta mayor on Trump's riot response: "He speaks and he makes it worse"

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms responded on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday to President Trump's tweets and comments about the mass protests that have swept across the United States, urging him to "just stop talking."

What she's saying: "This is like Charlottesville all over again. He speaks and he makes it worse. There are times when you should just be quiet. And I wish that he would just be quiet."

The cracks in Trump’s GOP shield

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

President Trump’s mockery of coronavirus masks, his false claims about the dangers of voting by mail and his insinuations that a cable TV nemesis was involved in a murder are testing more high-profile Republicans' willingness to look the other way.

The big picture: Republicans learned a long time ago how dangerous it is to alienate Trump’s base — which is why any hint of disagreement, even a whisper, is so remarkable when it happens.

Trump: White House protestors would be met with "vicious dogs" if they breached fence

President Trump meets with industry executives on May 29. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted Saturday that "the most vicious dogs, and the most ominous weapons" would have greeted protestors at the White House had they breached the area's fence on Friday night.

What's happening: Demonstrators protesting the killing of George Floyd gathered around the White House on Friday, as police cracked down on similar protests across the country.