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Courtesy: Capcom

This week's biggest release is "Resident Evil Village," the latest in gaming's most popular horror series. In the new one, players must explore a creepy town and battle its monstrous citizens.

Driving the news: We asked the "RE: Village" producer Tsuyoshi Kanda about how the team figures out how scary their games should be.

Instilling fear in the player is not the only goal: "When we develop a new 'Resident Evil' game, our goal is not always to make it scarier than the previous title, but find a balance to deliver a scary but fun experience for players."

  • For 2017's "Resident Evil 7," they knew they needed to get scarier: "For [that game] our primary focus was returning to our roots and looking back at the original 'Resident Evil' and assessing why it gave birth to the genre of survival horror. We drew heavy inspiration from the first title and wanted to reimagine that level of horror with modern technology. We wanted to place players in very tight spaces, as if the walls of the Baker mansion were closing in on them."
  • The horror works differently in the new one: "For 'Resident Evil Village,' we took an entirely different approach with the openness of the village and players not knowing what might be lurking beyond the trees."
  • In fact, maybe they did overdid it with RE7: "Some of the feedback we received regarding [RE7] that it was too scary to play. In one regard, that’s exactly what we were striving for, so it's a huge compliment for us. But at the same time, it's always our goal to create something that anybody can feel comfortable jumping in and playing, so we eased up on the tension curve [in RE Village] relative to 'Resident Evil 7: Biohazard,' so that players aren't in constant fear."

The bottom line: The big lesson is that players shouldn't be scared all the time.

  • "Something we also always have to pay attention to is the tension curve," Kanda said. "We also find that people grow immune to fear if they're consistently pitted up against a tense situation or environment."
  • "Those moments of solace act as a buffer to make sure that people aren't completely desensitized to the horror. The save rooms that you often see in many 'Resident Evil' games is a great example of that, where players can take a deep breath and know that they are safe."

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - World

Death toll mounts as fighting between Israel and Hamas intensifies

Palestinian Muslims exchange wishes for Eid al-Fitr, marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan, near a razed building in the northern Gaza Strip town of Beit Lahia, on May 13. Photo: Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images

At least 109 Palestinians and seven people in Israel have been killed since recent fighting between Israel's military and Hamas began Monday.

The big picture: Israel began massing troops on its border with Gaza on Thursday, launching attacks from the air and ground as Hamas continued to fire rockets into Israel.

By the numbers: Where the earmarks are wanted

Expand chart
Data: House Committee on Appropriations; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

The Dallas-Fort Worth area is being targeted for the largest collective earmark request in the country, according to a detailed breakdown of overall requests released by the House Appropriations Committee.

Why it matters: House appropriators are trying to balance bipartisan momentum for infrastructure investment with "pork-barrel" spending's checkered political history. The data dump is an effort to provide transparency for what are now termed "community project funding" requests.

Democrats open to user fees for infrastructure deal

President Biden sits Thursday with Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) as they discuss his $2.3 trillion infrastructure proposal. Photo: T.J. Kirkpatrick/The New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Some Senate Democrats are open to paying for a compromise infrastructure package by imposing user fees, including increasing the gas tax and raising money from electric car drivers through a vehicle-miles-traveled charge.

Why it matters: By inching toward the Republican position on pay-fors, some Democrats are bucking President Biden's push to offset his proposed $2.3 trillion plan by focusing only on raising taxes on corporations and the wealthy.