Nov 22, 2019

Refugee resettlement agencies sue Trump admin over executive order

Protesters gather at the Capitol as they protest U.S. refugee policies. Photo: Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Three refugee resettlement agencies filed suit on Thursday against the Trump administration for an executive order signed in September that permits state and local officials to block resettlement in their jurisdictions, the groups announced.

The big picture: The order requires cities and states to give written consent before refugees can be settled there. The three agencies, HIAS, a Jewish nonprofit, Church World Service and Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Services, are asking the court to block the order as it is tried in court.

What they're saying: The groups argue the order seeks to "dismantle the nearly 40-year-old federal resettlement infrastructure and restrict refugees from entering the United States."

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Kamala Harris leads 27 senators in demanding Stephen Miller's removal

Photos: Mandel Ngan/AFP; Ethan Miller via Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) led a group of 27 Democratic senators on Monday in demanding that President Trump remove senior White House adviser Stephen Miller, following a report from the Southern Poverty Law Center that alleged he shared white nationalist content with the right-wing news site Breitbart.

The big picture: "Mr. Miller's demonstrable white nationalist ideology has been directly translated into your administration's policies, which have been widely criticized for systematically targeting communities of color," the senators write in a letter.

Go deeperArrowDec 9, 2019

U.S. sends first Honduran asylum seeker sent to Guatemala

Dozens of people seen waiting to enter the U.S. on the Northern side of the International Bridge over the Rio Grande, in Matamoros, Tamaulipas state, Mexico. Photo: LEXIE HARRISON-CRIPPS/AFP via Getty Images

The first Honduran migrant was sent to Guatemala on Thursday to pursue his asylum case, the AP reports, kicking off a "landmark" Trump administration policy.

Flashback: Guatemala signed a "safe third country" agreement in July, agreeing to take in more Central American asylum seekers in an effort to slow migration in the U.S. The policy mostly impacts immigrants from Honduras and El Salvador whose routes to the U.S. go through Guatemala. Thousands of Guatemalans left the country last year to seek asylum in the U.S., Al Jazeera notes.

Go deeperArrowNov 22, 2019

Supreme Court to decide on release of Trump’s financial records

President Trump. Photo: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / Contributor/Getty Images

The Supreme Court agreed on Friday to take on three cases involving President Trump's finances to determine whether he can block the release of his records.

Why it matters: The court's ruling could give the American public a look at the president's finances after he has gone to great lengths to keep them under wraps.

Go deeperArrowDec 13, 2019