Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Congressional Republicans presented anything but a unified front on Monday night after Sens. Mike Lee and Jerry Moran announced their opposition to the Senate health care bill, killing it at least in its current form. Some immediately called for a straight repeal bill, while others discussed alternative replacements and still others acknowledged the party is far from being able to pass anything now.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced that the next step will be a straight repeal vote, with no replacement for the Affordable Care Act. That's what President Trump wants, even though insiders say it has no chance of passage in the Senate. "Republicans should just REPEAL failing ObamaCare now & work on a new Healthcare Plan that will start from a clean slate. Dems will join in!" he tweeted shortly before McConnell's announcement.

Contrast with this: "Thank god. Now the bill can die," one senior GOP Senate aide texted.

The White House quickly made clear it doesn't want Congress to give up. "We look forward to Congress continuing to work toward a bill the President can sign to end the Obamacare nightmare and restore quality care at affordable prices," said a White House spokesman.

What we're watching: If the party can consolidate around any particular direction. If not, things are going to get nasty.

What comes next:

  • House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows: "Time for full repeal of #Obamacare--let's put the same thing on President Trump's desk that we put on President Obama's desk." (A reference to a 2015 repeal bill passed through the same Senate process.)
  • Conn Carroll, a Lee spokesman, on what he wants next: "Full [Consumer Freedom Amendment] or 2015 repeal bill." He's referencing an amendment he worked on with Sen. Ted Cruz, which was amended in this version of the Senate bill.
  • Sen. Lindsey Graham on his proposal to turn health care over to the states: "Graham-Cassidy is the conservative approach to solving the problems Obamacare created."
  • Sen. John McCain, who's recovering from surgery: "The Congress must now return to regular order, hold hearings, receive input from members of both parties, and heed the recommendations of our nation's governors so that we can produce a bill that finally provides Americans with access to quality and affordable health care."
  • The senior aide: "I will reserve judgment until after [Senate GOP caucus] lunch [on Tuesday]. Let's see what those two want. They are in very different places."
  • A second senior GOP aide: "How many more changes could possibly be made at this point. We're talking about people on the absolute ends of our spectrum. Every time you move toward one you move away from the other."

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
15 mins ago - Energy & Environment

Higher education expands its climate push

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

New or expanded climate initiatives are popping up at several universities, a sign of the topic's rising prominence and recognition of the threats and opportunities it creates.

Why it matters: Climate and clean energy initiatives at colleges and universities are nothing new, but it shows expanded an campus focus as the effects of climate change are becoming increasingly apparent, and the world is nowhere near the steep emissions cuts that scientists say are needed to hold future warming in check.

Ina Fried, author of Login
41 mins ago - Economy & Business

The pandemic isn't slowing tech

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Thursday's deluge of Big Tech earnings reports showed one thing pretty clearly: COVID-19 may be bad in all sorts of ways, but it's not slowing down the largest tech companies. If anything, it's helping some companies, like Amazon and Apple.

Yes, but: With the pandemic once again worsening in the U.S. and Europe, it's not clear how long the tech industry's winning streak can last.

Texas early voting surpasses 2016's total turnout

Early voting in Austin earlier this month. Photo: Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Texas' early and mail-in voting totals for the 2020 election have surpassed the state's total voter turnout in 2016, with 9,009,850 ballots already cast compared to 8,969,226 in the last presidential cycle.

Why it matters: The state's 38 Electoral College votes are in play — and could deliver a knockout blow for Joe Biden over President Trump — despite the fact that it hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1976.