Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Refraction AI's REV-1 robot. Photo: Refraction AI

Refraction AI, a robot delivery startup in Ann Arbor, Mich., was having trouble gaining traction before the pandemic — and now, it's racing to capitalize on our stay-at-home mentality.

Why it matters: In the midst of the pain and suffering from a crisis, there's often room for innovation by forward-looking entrepreneurs with good timing.

Founders Matt Johnson-Roberson and Ram Vasudevan, both professors at the University of Michigan, developed an autonomous electric cargo bike they believed would be cheaper and easier to deploy than other delivery robots. They said...

  • The three-wheeled REV-1 can travel in bike lanes or on the street, thus filling a sweet spot between small sidewalk robots like Starship and Nuro's compact delivery vans.
  • It’s categorized as an e-bike, so it has fewer regulatory hurdles.
  • Teleoperators monitor the robots remotely to take over when needed at busy intersections.
  • The company raised $2.5 million and started a six-month pilot with eight robots delivering prepared meals to some 500 customers in Ann Arbor.
  • Still, convincing people to get their dinner from a robot was a challenge.

Then the coronavirus arrived. Stay-at-home orders created a surge in grocery delivery, and Refraction AI quickly pivoted.

  • "I said, this is our moment. Our dream was to get to national scale, but we didn't know what the path looked like until this virus hit," Johnson-Roberson told me.
  • "It took a pandemic to crystallize for people why robot delivery could be huge."

The company is quadrupling output, with help from Michigan's Roush Industries, and expects to have 25 robots running in Ann Arbor within the next two months.

  • "We had a six-month plan ... that turned into a two-week plan."

What's next: The company is beginning a free touchless grocery delivery service in Ann Arbor, using its own employees as pickers to load the vehicles at the store.

Go deeper

58 mins ago - Technology

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Minority Mitch still setting Senate agenda

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Chuck Schumer may be majority leader, yet in many ways, Mitch McConnell is still running the Senate show — and his counterpart is about done with it.

Why it matters: McConnell rolled over Democrats unapologetically, and kept tight control over his fellow Republicans, while in the majority. But he's showing equal skill as minority leader, using political jiujitsu to convert a perceived weakness into strength.