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Virginia's Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam issued a statement Friday apologizing for his decision to appear in a racist photo published in his 1984 medical school yearbook, writing: "I am deeply sorry for the decision I made to appear as I did in this photo and for the hurt that decision caused then and now."

The big picture: A page from Northam's yearbook, obtained Friday by The Virginian-Pilot, shows people wearing blackface and Ku Klux Klan attire. In his statement, Northam did not offer to resign or identify which of the two people is him, but said he is ready to do the "important work" of healing the damage his conduct has caused. He later posted a video on Twitter again apologizing for his actions, and signaled that he would do everything he could to regain his constituents' trust "through the remainder of [his] term."

Statement:

“Earlier today, a website published a photograph of me from my 1984 medical school yearbook in a costume that is clearly racist and offensive. 
“I am deeply sorry for the decision I made to appear as I did in this photo and for the hurt that decision caused then and now.
“This behavior is not in keeping with who I am today and the values I have fought for throughout my career in the military, in medicine, and in public service. But I want to be clear, I understand how this decision shakes Virginians’ faith in that commitment.
“I recognize that it will take time and serious effort to heal the damage this conduct has caused. I am ready to do that important work. The first step is to offer my sincerest apology and to state my absolute commitment to living up to the expectations Virginians set for me when they elected me to be their Governor.”

Video:

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Go deeper ... What they're saying: Officials condemn Northam's racist yearbook photo

Go deeper

Chauvin defense closing: "Does not have to prove his innocence"

Chauvin's defense attorney Eric Nelson opened his closing argument on Monday by reminding the jury that Derek Chauvin "does not have to prove his innocence."

Why it matters: The jury's verdict in Chauvin's murder trial is seen by advocates as one of the most crucial civil rights cases in decades.

Merrick Garland: Domestic terror is "still with us"

Photo: Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In his first major speech, Attorney General Merrick Garland warned the nation Monday to remain vigilant against the rising threat of domestic extremism.

Why it matters: Domestic terrorism poses an "elevated threat" to the nation this year, according to U.S. intelligence. Garland has already pledged to crack down on violence linked to white supremacists and right-wing militia groups.