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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Two notorious white nationalist novels are seeing their online values surge as social media companies remove white supremacists and far-right activists continue to use popular online venues to sell racist material.

Why it matters: The $200 asking price of the 1973 "The Camp of the Saints," a book that sold for $40 six months ago, shows the demand for white nationalist literature remains high as the Department of Homeland Security warns of the potential for violence following President Biden's inauguration.

  • "The Turner Diaries" has been removed from many platforms but regularly resurfaces on others and sells online for double its normal price.

Details: "The Camp of the Saints" is a French dystopian novel that uses racial stereotypes and calls for violence in depicting the fall of white Western civilization because of migration from South Asia and Africa.

  • "The Turner Diaries," by neo-Nazi author William Luther Pierce, details a violent revolution in the U.S. followed by a race war where white residents face extermination. The Southern Poverty Law Center calls it the "bible of the racist right."
  • Both books had long existed on the fringes, but in recent years their popularity has grown as white nationalist groups become more visible.

Where it stands: Amazon has "The Camp of the Saints" listed from third-party sellers for around $200 to $1,000.

  • Faceboook Marketplace has the book listed for $200, as do used book sites like Alibris.
  • "The Turner Diaries" also is listed on a number of sites for around $40 when a few months ago it ran for less than $20.
  • "This shows that the indoctrination of racist extremists continues and newbies are being targeted," Center for Countering Digital Hate CEO Imran Ahmed told Axios.

Yes, but: The bump in prices for the books could also mean the material is out of print and white nationalists have been deplatformed, said Mark Pitcavage, a senior research fellow at the Anti-Defamation League's Center on Extremism.

  • "It used to be you had to get these books at gun shows or by direct mail from white nationalist publishers, but then the Internet made it easier for a while. It could be that these books are going back (to being) hard to get."

Flashback: Leaked emails in 2019 showed that Donald Trump's future senior White House adviser, Stephen Miller, in 2015 encouraged the far-right website Breitbart to promote white supremacist ideas and referenced "The Camp of the Saints."

What they're saying: "The fact that Amazon and others are profiting from the indoctrination of extreme racists is beyond disgusting. These platforms are morally complicit," Ahmed said.

  • Amazon said in a statement that the company has policies that outline what products may be sold on its platform and is also concerned about the history of censorship.
  • "We invest significant time and resources to ensure our content guidelines are followed, and remove products that do not adhere to our guidelines," Amazon said in a statement.

The big question: Anti-racist activists are debating whether advocates should read the novels to understand and better counter white nationalism or pressure private companies from carrying the materials.

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden adviser Cedric Richmond sees first-term progress on reparations

Illustration: "Axios on HBO"

White House senior adviser Cedric Richmond told "Axios on HBO" that it's "doable" for President Biden to make first-term progress on breaking down barriers for people of color, while Congress studies reparations for slavery.

Why it matters: Biden said on the campaign trail that he supports creation of a commission to study and develop proposals for reparations — direct payments for African-Americans.

Cyber CEO: Next war will hit regular Americans online

Any future real-world conflict between the United States and an adversary like China or Russia will have direct impacts on regular Americans because of the risk of cyber attack, Kevin Mandia, CEO of cybersecurity company FireEye, tells "Axios on HBO."

What they're saying: "The next conflict where the gloves come off in cyber, the American citizen will be dragged into it, whether they want to be or not. Period."

Cedric Richmond: We won't wait on GOP for "insufficient" stimulus

Top Biden adviser Cedric Richmond told "Axios on HBO" the White House believes it has bipartisan support for a stimulus bill outside the Beltway.

  • "If our choice is to wait and go bipartisan with an insufficient package, we are not going to do that."

The big picture: The bill will likely undergo an overhaul in the Senate after House Democrats narrowly passed a stimulus bill this weekend, reports Axios' Kadia Goba.