Expand chart
Data: Survey Monkey online poll conducted Nov. 13-15, 2018 among 2,798 U.S. adults. Total margin of error is ±2.5 percentage points; Poll methodology; Chart: Chris Canipe/Axios

Americans don’t trust Republicans or President Trump to bring down drug prices, according to our latest Axios/SurveyMonkey poll. But what stands out isn't just that they don't do well — it's that they come in third, behind the Democrats and "neither."

By the numbers: Asked who they trust the most on the issue, the top three vote-getters were: Democrats (35%), neither party (30%), and then Trump and the Republicans (27%). That's fueled by Democrats and Republicans voting for their team while independents are deeply cynical about both parties.

There’s always a partisan split in any political poll, but man, this is more of a partisan Grand Canyon.

  • Just 2% of Republicans said they trust Democrats to lower drug prices.
  • Just 1% of Democrats said they trust Republicans.
  • Independents don’t like anyone — 72% said they don’t trust either party on this issue.

The poll also found that Americans specifically don't have confidence in Trump's plan to lower drug prices, as we reported this weekend.

The bottom line: Trump and the GOP have a lot of work to do to gain confidence on an issue that's so important to Americans. But even the Democrats fall pretty far short of a mandate on an issue they'll push hard when they take control of the House.

Methodology: This analysis is based on a SurveyMonkey online poll conducted among adults ages 18 and older in the United States. Respondents were selected from the more than 2 million people who take surveys on the SurveyMonkey platform each day. Data have been weighted for age, race, sex, education, and geography using the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey to reflect the demographic composition of the United States age 18 and over.

The survey was conducted Nov. 13-15 among 2,798 adults. The modeled error estimate for the full sample is plus or minus 2.5 percentage points and full crosstabs are available here.

Go deeper

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 21,020,216 — Total deaths: 761,393— Total recoveries: 13,048,303Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 5,289,323 — Total deaths: 167,948 — Total recoveries: 1,774,648 — Total tests: 64,831,306Map.
  3. Health: CDC: Survivors of COVID-19 have up to three months of immunity Fauci believes normalcy will return by "the end of 2021" with vaccine — The pandemic's toll on mental health.
  4. Business: How small businesses got stiffed — Unemployment starts moving in the right direction.
  5. Cities: Coronavirus pandemic dims NYC's annual 9/11 Tribute in Light.
  6. Politics: Biden signals fall strategy with new ads.

Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.

Facebook goes after Apple

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Facebook is seeking to force a face-off with Apple over its 30% in-app purchase commission fee, which Facebook suggests hurts small businesses struggling to get by during the pandemic.

The big picture: Facebook has never publicly gone after Apple, a key strategic partner, this aggressively. Both companies face antitrust scrutiny, which in Apple's case has centered on the very fee structure Facebook is now attacking.