President Donald Trump during his swearing-in ceremony in 2017. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Federal prosecutors in New York have ordered President Trump’s inaugural committee to turn over documents relating to its donors, finances and event attendees, the New York Times reports, citing sources with knowledge of the investigation.

Details: The news was first reported by ABC News on Monday evening, which noted that specific details of the request remain unclear, and that the investigation — which comes as many observers have speculated that special counsel Robert Mueller is nearing to his Russia probe — is zooming in on Trump's political fundraising both before and after his 2016 presidential election.

Prosecutors in New York’s Southern District are reportedly interested in whether foreign nationals funneled donations into the committee, which would be illegal under law.

  • A spokesman for the inaugural committee, a nonprofit in charged of organizing festivities surrounding the wearing-in ceremony, told ABC News: "We have just received a subpoena for documents. While we are still reviewing the subpoena, it is our intention to cooperate with the inquiry."
  • A spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office in Manhattan declined to comment.

Trump’s former personal attorney Michael Cohen "has been extensively interviewed by prosecutors in the Southern District office," per ABC News.

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Updated 15 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Where key GOP senators stand on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to reporters on Capitol Hill last Thursday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With President Trump planning to nominate his third Supreme Court justice nominee this week, key Republican senators are indicating their stance on replacing the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg with less than 50 days until Election Day.

The state of play: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) has vowed that "Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate." Two GOP senators — Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) — have said they oppose holding a vote before the election, meaning that two more defections would force McConnell to delay until at least the lame-duck session of Congress.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 30,873,714 — Total deaths: 958,383— Total recoveries: 21,103,559Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 6,788,343 — Total deaths: 199,421 — Total recoveries: 2,577,446 — Total tests: 94,211,463Map.
  3. Politics: Testing czar on Trump's CDC contradictions: "Everybody is right" Ex-FDA chief: Career scientists won't be "easily cowed" by political vaccine pressure
  4. Education: What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning
  5. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19.
  6. World: England sets £10,000 fine for breaking self-isolation rules — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.

Biden to Senate GOP after RBG passing: "Please follow your conscience"

Joe Biden made a direct appeal to Senate Republicans in a speech addressing the passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, urging them to "cool the flames that have been engulfing our country" by waiting to confirm her replacement until after the election.

The state of play: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said soon after the news of Ginsburg's death that President Trump's nominee would get a vote on the Senate floor.