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Megan Rapinoe #15 of United States holds the 2019 FIFA World Cup Champion Trophy. Photo: Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images

U.S. Soccer partner and sponsor Procter & Gamble donated more than $500,000 to the team's players association, signaling support “to be on the right side of history" on equal pay for all of its athletes, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: P&G's announcement, the first of its kind, could increase pressure on U.S. Soccer to resolve the players' federal gender discrimination lawsuit.

Context: The issue on equal pay was re-highlighted after the U.S. women's national soccer team won the World Cup final last week against the Netherlands. As the women's team celebrated their victory on the field last Sunday, "equal pay" chants erupted among fans.

  • The team filed a wage-discrimination complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 2016. 28 teammates later sued the federation alleging years of "institutionalized gender discrimination.”
  • On Monday, the team and the federation begin mediation talks, per NYT.

P&G's Secret deodorant brand said in an advertising campaign that its $529,000 donation is symbolic. "Inequality is about more than pay and players. It’s about values," it said.

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Yes, but: On NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday, U.S. Women's Soccer team co-captain Megan Rapinoe said she was disappointed in how the team's sponsors have been handling the equal pay conversation. She responded to P&G's donation, saying these companies should have been on the forefront of the issue:

“These are some of the most powerful corporations, not just in sports but in the world, and have so much weight that they can throw around. And I think that they just need to get comfortable with throwing it around.”

Rapinoe said she would keep fighting: “I'm going to fight for equal pay every day for myself, for my team, and for every single person out there, man, woman, immigrant, U.S. citizen, person of color, whatever it may be. ‘Equal pay,’ as the great Serena Williams said, ‘Until I'm in my grave.’”

Go deeper: U.S. women's national soccer team generating more game revenue than men since 2015

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.

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