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John Bolton (L), acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney (C), and Mike Pompeo listen to President Trump in the White House in July 2019. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo accused former national security adviser John Bolton late on Thursday of "spreading a number of lies, fully-spun half-truths, and outright falsehoods" in his upcoming tell-all book.

Why it matters: The book "recounts Pompeo breaking with the president across a broad spectrum of his foreign policy issues, from his near-war footing with Iran, transactional dealings with China, diplomatic flirtations with North Korea and freewheeling discussions with allies," according to the Washington Post, which obtained an advanced copy.

  • Bolton claims that Pompeo slipped him a note during Trump’s 2018 meeting with North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un that commented on Trump, saying: “he is so full of shit,” in an advanced copy of the book obtained by the Times. Pompeo reportedly dismissed Trump's North Korea diplomacy as having "zero probability of success.”

What he's saying:

"I've not read the book, but from the excerpts I've seen published, John Bolton is spreading a number of lies, fully-spun half-truths, and outright falsehoods. It is both sad and dangerous that John Bolton's final public role is that of a traitor who damaged America by violating his sacred trust with its people. To our friends around the world: you know that President Trump's America is a force for good in the world."
— Pompeo wrote in a statement on Thursday

Go deeper: Highlights from the excerpts of John Bolton's book

Go deeper

The top Republicans who aren't voting for Trump in 2020

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said last week that he cannot support President Trump's re-election.

Why it matters: Hogan, a moderate governor in a blue state, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.