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President Trump in Oval Office. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

69% of American voters believe a sitting president should be subject to criminal charges, including 52% of Republicans, according to a Quinnipiac national poll that surveyed 1,214 people.

Yes, but: Just 16% of Republicans believe Trump committed crimes before he was in office, and 5% of Republicans believe he has done so while president.

Why it matters: The findings run counter to a controversial Justice Department's policy that contends a sitting president cannot be indicted for fear that "a federal criminal accusation against a sitting President would place burdens on the President's capacity to govern and potentially preempt constitutional processes for addressing presidential misconduct."

  • Worth noting: Support for being able to indict a sitting president is down from 71% in Quinnipiac's December 2018 poll.

Other highlights: The phone survey, conducted from June 6-10, found that the majority of the public still does not support impeaching President Trump.

  • 44% of voters believe that Trump deserves to be impeached. However, just 33% of voters and 62% of Democrats support Congress beginning the process of impeachment.
  • 57% overall believe Trump committed crimes before he took office. Voters are evenly split, 45% for and 45% against, on whether Trump committed crimes while he has been president.
  • 55% of voters believe Attorney General Bill Barr did not accurately represent the conclusions of the Mueller report to the American public. 35% of voters believe the Mueller report cleared Trump of any wrongdoing.

The big picture: Though the Constitution explains that a president can be removed from office due to "high crimes and misdemeanors," the document is silent on whether a president can face criminal prosecution in court. The Supreme Court has also not directly answered the question.

Methodology: From June 6 - 10, Quinnipiac University surveyed 1,214 voters nationwide with a margin of error of +/- 3.5 percentage points, including the design effect.

Go deeper: Over 650 former prosecutors say Trump would be indicted if he weren't president

Go deeper

44 mins ago - Health

Boris Johnson announces month-long COVID-19 lockdown in U.K.

Prime Minsiter Boris Johnson. Photo: NurPhoto / Getty Images

A new national lockdown will be imposed in the U.K., Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced Saturday, as the number of COVID-19 cases in the country topped 1 million.

Details: Starting Thursday, people in England must stay at home, and bars and restaurants will close, except for takeout and deliveries. All non-essential retail will also be shuttered. Different households will be banned from mixing indoors. International travel, unless for business purposes, will be banned. The new measures will last through at least December 2.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The massive early vote

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Early voting in the 2020 election across the U.S. on Saturday had already reached 65.5% of 2016's total turnout, according to state data compiled by the U.S. Elections Project.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic and its resultant social-distancing measures prompted a massive uptick in both mail-in ballots and early voting nationwide, setting up an unprecedented and potentially tumultuous count in the hours and days after the polls close on Nov. 3.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat.
  2. World: Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike — Austria reimposes coronavirus lockdowns amid surge of infections
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
  5. States: New York rolls out new testing requirements for visitors.