Updated Feb 21, 2018

Poll: Americans don't want self-driving cars

Go deeper

Ride-sharing of the future

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Auto companies, counterintuitively, are trying to get people to give up their cars — by making shared transportation more appealing with vehicles that recognize you, anticipate your needs and customize your ride.

Why it matters: Ride-hailing apps are making urban congestion steadily worse. In San Francisco, people spent 62% more time sitting in traffic in 2016 than in 2010. Uber and Lyft admitted they're part of the problem.

Go deeperArrowJan 3, 2020

The Fiat Chrysler-PSA merger can't solve all their problems

PSA's Carlos Tavares (left) and FCA's Mike Manley. Photo: Courtesy of FCA

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is merging with France's PSA Group to create the world's fourth-largest automaker, a deal intended to help both companies bear the cost of new technologies like electric and self-driving cars.

The big picture: The merger also gives Peugeot's parent a long-desired entry into the U.S. and will help FCA catch up in fuel-efficient powertrains. "It is better to face the challenges of the future together than on a standalone basis," PSA CEO Carlos Tavares said during an investor call, CNBC reported.

Go deeperArrowDec 20, 2019

America's ideological balance continues to lean center-right

Photo: Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Despite 47% of Americans identifying with the Democratic Party in 2019, the ideological balance of U.S. voters remains center-right, according to a survey of 29,000 U.S. adults released by Gallup Thursday.

Why it matters: Ideology and party identification both play a role in election variability, Gallup points out. Without ideology, the prevalence of voters identifying as Democrats would likely lead to electoral dominance. Without partisanship, a center-right candidate would consistently prevail.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020