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Gov. Jay Inslee. Photo: Karen Ducey via Getty Images

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D) on Tuesday signed a dozen bills aimed at curbing police misconduct and boosting accountability.

Why it matters: The move comes as the United States continues to grapple with police brutality and racial justice. It's "one of the nation's most ambitious packages" of its kind, AP writes.

The bills:

  • Ban police use of chokeholds, neck restraints and no-knock warrants.
  • Require officers to intervene if a colleague engages in excessive force.
  • Create an independent office to review police use of deadly force.
  • Require officers to use "reasonable care," such as de-escalation tactics.
  • Make it easier to sue officers when they cause injury.

What he's saying: "The crises of the past year have unmasked long-standing inequities in our society. The consciousness of our state and nation has been raised against inequity in many forms," Inslee said in a statement.

  • "Our moral mandate to acknowledge these hard truths crystallized in the fallout from the killing of George Floyd in Minnesota, and the killing of Manny Ellis in Tacoma," he added.
  • "The bills I am signing today respect these truths and lay a solid foundation to halt inequity’s pernicious influence in our systems of government."

The big picture: The move comes as a North Carolina prosecutor claimed the police killing of Andrew Brown Jr. was "justified," though lawyers for Brown's family have demanded the release of full bodycam footage and the State Bureau of Investigation's report.

Go deeper: The slow moves to improve police training

Go deeper

The slow moves to improve police training

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Police departments around the country have been ramping up training programs in the year since George Floyd's death — but no one should expect them to have enough impact in one year to prevent more tragic deaths of people of color, according to training experts and practitioners.

Why it matters: If the training does have a meaningful impact in steering officers away from deadly confrontations, it could take years to see results, experts say — and there's little solid evidence that it works.

Prosecutor: Fatal police shooting of Andrew Brown Jr. was "justified"

Khalil Ferebee (C), the son of Andrew Brown Jr., and attorneys Bakari Sellers (L) and Harry Daniel (R) at a May 11 news conference in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

A North Carolina prosecutor said Tuesday that the death of Andrew Brown Jr., a Black man fatally shot by sheriff's deputies last month, was "tragic" but "justified," due to the immediate threat officers believed Brown posed.

Why it matters: The FBI has opened a civil rights investigation into Brown's death. Police in Elizabeth City shot him five times, including in the back of his head, according to an independent autopsy report released by family attorneys last month.

Supreme Court declines to broaden police power in warrantless searches of homes

Photo: Erin Scott/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Supreme Court on Monday unanimously declined to give police broad power to search homes without warrants.

Why it matters: In the majority opinion, Justice Clarence Thomas acknowledged the Court has maintained that a community caretaking exception allows police to search cars without a warrant in certain dangerous situations. But he wrote Monday that the exception does not extend broadly to the home.