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Holocaust survivor Malkah Gorka holds a picture from her school days in Poland during a protest in front of Polish embassy in Tel Aviv. Photo: Gil Cohen-Magen / AFP / Getty Images

A Polish law making it illegal to attribute crimes committed during the Holocaust to Poland officially comes into effect today, though it is still being reviewed by a constitutional tribunal.

The big picture: Israel considered withdrawing its ambassador over the matter, forcing a Polish delegation to visit in an effort to diffuse the situation. And the United States has strongly objected to the law, which the State Department has warned would “inhibit discussion and commentary on the Holocaust." As a result, Poland’s Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Marek Magierowski traveled to Washington to meet with Jewish groups and U.S. officials.

At a breakfast with reporters on Wednesday, Magierowski said the justice ministry would seek to temporarily suspend the law until the constitutional review is over — a process he said would likely take a few weeks. However, certain statements assigning blame to Poland for the mass slaughter of Jews are now technically illegal.

  • "There is a serious crisis in our relationship now with Israel and with the United States," Magierowski acknowledged. He added that Poland "might have made a few mistakes" in terms of communicating the true intentions behind the law, which he said was designed to provide a "legal tool to counter the painful narrative that Poland is co-responsible for the Holocaust."
  • "Some ministers in the government were quite surprised by the intensity of the backlash,” he said, adding that the issue was a "distraction" from talks regarding permanent bases for U.S. troops in Poland and other key issues.

Go deeper: Hungary and Poland, the EU's awkward squad.

Go deeper

Focus group: Former Trump voters say he should never hold office again

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

"Relief" is the top emotion some swing voters who used to support Donald Trump say they felt as they watched President Biden's swearing-in, followed by "hope."

Why it matters: For voters on the bubble between parties, this moment is less about excitement for Biden or liberal politics than exhaustion and disgust with Trump and a craving for national healing. Most said Trump should be prohibited from ever holding office again.

Updated 12 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.