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A sorting center in France. Photo: Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

Plastics are intertwined with our lives today — driving researchers to create plant-based versions and more efficient ways to recycle.

The big picture: From a science perspective, the biggest challenge is consumers and companies want materials that won’t degrade quickly while being used but will degrade quickly once disposed, says Andrew Dove, a professor of chemistry at the University of Birmingham in the U.K. “The world wants it both ways.”

"It's an incredible material," says Marc Hillmyer, who directs the Center for Sustainable Polymers at the University of Minnesota, and points to plastics use in transporting food and water, and protecting solar cells and windmill blades that anchor the renewable energy economy.

  • "We need them, but not for everything," he says.

How it works: Plastics are recycled or burned as a source of energy, but by one estimate, 79% of plastic waste has ended up in landfills or the environment.

  • Plastics can be mixed with pigments, other materials and other plastics, which complicate recycling and limit how the chemical components of plastic can be reused.

The push for "green plastics" made from sustainable materials gave us, for example, cups made from corn-based plastic (polylactic acid) and compostable chip bags that degrade under certain circumstances.

  • Researchers are trying to develop new materials that could replace common plastics — from that foam in flower arrangements to straws.
  • The challenge is finding a sweet spot between making a plastic easier to break down and the need for durability and other desired characteristics.

Replacing petroleum-based plastics is still important in the long term, says Dove, but as it accumulates in landfills, researchers are increasingly focusing on new ways to make and recycle today's materials.

  • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers recently reported a new way to create a plastic commonly found in epoxies and polyurethane.
  • They were then able to break it down to its chemical building blocks, even when the plastics were colored or with other materials, and turn them back into plastic.
  • Yes, but: The process requires large amounts of water and hasn't been demonstrated to work on an industrial scale.

Scientists are also experimenting with degrading plastics using:

  • Chemical recycling: Different acids and bases can be used to break down plastics. Researchers hope to develop chemicals that can selectively degrade a single type of plastic in a stream of mixed plastic waste.
  • Enzymes: They have the advantage of being specific to a type of plastic but the disadvantage of working slowly compared to chemical recycling.

The bottom line: It's going to take a combination of new materials and improved recycling methods to minimize the impacts of our plastics dependency. "There's not going to be a panacea," says Hillmyer.

Go deeper: Scientists grapple with the world's plastic problem

Go deeper

45 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Jen Psaki: "With that I’d love to take your questions”

In her inaugural briefing as White House press secretary, Jen Psaki said she has a “deep respect for the role of a free and independent press in our democracy,” and pledged to hold daily briefings.

Why it matters: Conferences with the press secretary in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room became almost non-existent under the Trump administration. By sending Psaki to the podium hours after President Biden took the oath of office, the White House signaled a return to pre-Trump norms.

Avril Haines confirmed as director of national intelligence

Haines. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Image

Avril Haines was quickly confirmed by the Senate on Wednesday as the director of national intelligence (DNI) in a vote of 84-10.

Why it matters: Haines is the first of President Biden's nominees to receive a full Senate confirmation and she will be the first woman to serve as DNI. She's previously served as CIA deputy director from 2013 to 2015 and deputy national security adviser from 2015 to 2017.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

Biden delivers his inaugural address on the West Front of the Capitol. Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: The Celebrate America event, with remarks by Biden and Harris.