Jan 3, 2020

Tennessee GOP Rep. Phil Roe to retire in 2020

President Trump shakes hands with Rep. Phil Roe (R-Tenn.) during the signing ceremony for the Veterans Affairs Mission Act. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. Phil Roe (R-Tenn.) announced Friday he won't seek re-election in 2020, per WCYB.

The big picture: Roe, the ranking member of the House Veterans' Affairs Committee, is the 25th Republican to announce he will not run for re-election this cycle.

  • Roe told the Johnson City Press last month that he would base the decision to run for a seventh term on "personal" reasons and not political factors like President Trump's impeachment.

Of note: President Trump won Roe's district in 2016 by a nearly 57-point margin.

  • Roe's congressional seat has been held by a Republican since 1881.

What he's saying:

“The challenges we are facing now as complex as ever, and I still have a lot of fire in my belly. I look forward to finishing my term strongly for the East Tennesseans that I love representing and working with President Trump in favor of the free-market, conservative policies so many of us hold dear. I am equally confident East Tennessee is full of capable public servants who will step up to fill my void, and I am ready to give them the opportunity to do so."

Go deeper: The members of Congress departing in 2020

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Rep. Doug Collins confirms Georgia Senate run, triggering GOP battle

Rep. Doug Collins. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Georgia Rep. Doug Collins told "Fox & Friends" Wednesday he will challenge Sen. Kelly Loeffler, another Republican, for her seat in the state's election this year.

Why it matters: Collins' announcement has "sparked an intraparty Republican brawl between a top defender of President Trump and a business executive who was appointed to the post by Republican Gov. Brian Kemp," the Washington Post writes.

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Schiff boils down Ukraine allegations to "three days in July"

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Impeachment by the numbers

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Spencer Platt/Getty Images and Win McNamee/Getty Images

Take a step back, and little has changed in the political landscape four months after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi launched the inquiry against President Trump.

By the numbers: Trump's national approval numbers, public support for his removal and Joe Biden's place as the Democratic primary front-runner have held steady. Meanwhile, the GOP and Trump campaign are raising money off of impeachment.

Go deeperArrowJan 25, 2020