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Election officials count votes at the Allegheny County elections warehouse in Pittsburgh Friday. Photo: Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

Pennsylvania Republicans asked the Supreme Court on Friday to reiterate the rules for counting mail-in votes in the state, while acknowledging that they have no evidence to suggest those rules aren't being followed. The court granted the request late Friday.

The big picture: The Trump campaign has been clear that it wants to get the election before the Supreme Court somehow or another, but this new effort, as the results in Pennsylvania become clearer, is still highly unlikely to make much of a difference.

Details: Pennsylvania election officials said before Election Day that they would count mail-in ballots that were postmarked by Nov. 3 but arrived a few days later. There's an ongoing legal dispute about whether that extension was legal.

  • Because the extension is in dispute, state courts ordered Pennsylvania to segregate late-arriving votes from those that arrived on time — in case the late ones ultimately don't count.
  • Pennsylvania's secretary of state has issued two memos to election officials ordering them to comply with that instruction and keep the ballots separate.
  • The Pennsylvania Republican Party filed an emergency petition with the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday asking it to issue its own order requiring those ballots to be kept separate.
  • The party did not present any evidence or allegations that county officials aren't complying with the requirements, but said that "in the fast-paced and chaotic pace of postelection events in Pennsylvania, it is unclear whether all 67 county boards of elections are currently segregating late-arriving ballots."

The big picture: If the high court grants this request, it would allow Republicans to say they got something out of the Supreme Court — but it would be something they already had, and that's unlikely to make a difference.

  • These late-arriving ballots are very unlikely to determine who wins Pennsylvania. The state has said there aren't that many of them. If Biden can win the state without those votes, this case won't matter.
  • And while election-season emergency petitions are unique, the Supreme Court is not typically in the habit of issuing just-to-be-on-the-safe-side orders when no legal violation has been alleged.

This story has been updated to note that Justice Samuel Alito granted the request.

Go deeper

Off the Rails

A premeditated lie lit the fire

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

"Jared, you call the Murdochs! Jason, you call Sammon and Hemmer!”

President Trump was almost shouting. He directed his son-in-law and his senior strategist from his private quarters at the White House late on election night. He barked out the names of top Fox News executives and talent he expected to answer to him.

Major companies vow to train, hire Afghan refugees arriving in U.S.

Chobani founder and CEO Hamdi Ulukaya. Photo: Jeff Spicer/Getty Images for Global Citizen

More than 30 major companies have promised to hire and train Afghan refugees coming to the U.S., per a press release from the Tent Partnership for Refugees, the group spearheading the effort.

The big picture: The 33 companies, including Amazon, Facebook, Pfizer and UPS, are joining the Tent Coalition for Afghan Refugees, a coalition founded by Hamdi Ulukaya, the founder and CEO of yogurt and food company Chobani.

Hispanic Heritage Month: Gracias, México, for color TVs

The patent diagram (left) from Guillermo González Camarena's chromoscopic adapter, and he and the engineer (right inspecting TV equipment around 1955 in Mexico City. Photos: U.S. Patent Office and Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia de México

Credit Mexican engineering and entrepreneurship for developments that led to the in color television, oral contraception and finding a way to help mend the ozone layer.

Why it matters: The contributions helped modernize how we could see the world; improve women's health and expand women's roles beyond the home; and identify dangerous emissions and how to reduce them.