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Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Friday that election officials cannot reject a mailed-in ballot because a voter’s signature may not resemble the one on their registration form.

Why it matters: The decision comes as a win for voting rights advocates and Democrats who say the signature disqualification rule can disenfranchise voters. In 2016, it was the top reason that ballots were rejected, with 28% of disqualified ballots flagged for non-matching signatures, according to the Election Assistance Commission.

  • Friday's decision further indicated that mail ballots will not be disqualified because of “third-party challenges based on signature analysis and comparisons,” wiping out a method for politically motivated observers to dispute the efficacy of a vote based on a perceived signature mismatch.

The big picture: President Trump’s campaign and the Republican National Committee had challenged an earlier decision by Pennsylvania election officials to defend signature-matching, claiming the practice helped defend against fraud.

  • The state has little experience with voting by mail, but like many others is expected to see a wave of ballots submitted by mail due to the coronavirus pandemic. So far nearly 1.5 million voters across Pennsylvania have sent in ballots, according to the U.S. Elections Project.
  • Before this year absentee ballots were the only type of mail-in ballots permitted in the state, and were specifically for those who couldn't get to the polls on Election Day "due to travel or poor health," as per The Morning Call. This year marks the first time Pennsylvania voters are not required to have a specific excuse to vote by mail.

What they're saying: The court sided with the head of the Pennsylvania Department of State, Kathy Boockvar, who argued in her court filing that signature rejections pose “a grave risk of disenfranchisement on an arbitrary and wholly subjective basis," US News reports.

The bottom line: A smart analysis from FiveThirtyEight's Nathaniel Rakich details how the entire election could hinge on Pennsylvania:

  • "Pennsylvania is so important that our model gives Trump an 84 percent chance of winning the presidency if he carries the state — and it gives Biden a 96 percent chance of winning if Pennsylvania goes blue."

Go deeper: Top 5 mail voting mistakes (and how to avoid them)

Go deeper

Dec 14, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Early voting begins in Georgia's key Senate runoffs

Voters line outside the High Museum polling station in Atlanta, Georgia on the first day of voting in the state's Senate runoffs. Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

People lined up outside polling places across Georgia on Monday for the first day of early voting in the state's two runoff elections that will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.

The big picture: More than 1.2 million people have already requested mail-in absentee ballots and more than 260,000 have returned them as of Monday, per data compiled by the U.S. Elections Project.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
12 mins ago - Economy & Business

The digital dollar is now high priority for the Fed

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The U.S. is starting to get serious about a central-bank-backed digital currency, with recent comments from top officials laying out the strongest support yet.

Driving the news: On Tuesday Fed chair Jerome Powell told Congress that developing a digital dollar is a "high priority project for us," but added that there are "significant technical and policy questions."

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Coinbase files to go public

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase on Thursday filed to go public via a $1 billion direct listing.

Why it matters: This comes in the midst of a crypto boom, and the listing may further legitimize the industry.