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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Small Business Administration, which resumed accepting applications from small businesses for Paycheck Protection Program loans on Monday, says it is seeing double the volume as it did in the opening hours of the PPP's initial rollout.

By the numbers: The SBA says it had processed more than 100,000 loans from over 4,000 lenders as of 3:30pm ET.

Between the lines: The increased activity makes sense, given that the initial PPP ran out of money over a week ago and banks had begun stockpiling applications.

  • It also has resulted in slowed response time and tech crashes, which the SBA acknowledged in a statement.
  • Some new guardrails are intended to better ensure that smaller lenders don't get shut out, but that also could mean longer wait times. On the other hand, lenders can now submit applications in large batches, which should boost the early numbers.

The original PPP doled out $349 billion to 1.66 million small businesses, working out to an average loan size of $206,000. Were that average to hold, it would mean that more than $20 billion of the new $322 billion is already spoken for.

Note: Axios qualified for a loan under this program. More details here.

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
Aug 5, 2020 - Economy & Business

Why the employee retention credit is an overlooked stimulus issue

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

D.C. remains deadlocked on the next stimulus package, days after extended unemployment benefits ended and days before PPP is set to expire.

Where it stands: One unresolved issue that hasn't gotten enough attention is a proposed expansion of the employee retention credit, which could have a significant impact for companies that have experienced severe revenue declines.

Woman who allegedly stole laptop from Pelosi's office to sell to Russia is arrested

Photo: FBI

A woman accused of breaching the Capitol and planning to sell to Russia a laptop or hard drive she allegedly stole from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office was arrested in Pennsylvania's Middle District Monday, the Department of Justice said.

Driving the news: Riley June Williams, 22, is charged with illegally entering the Capitol as well as violent entry and disorderly conduct. She has not been charged over the laptop allegation and the case remains under investigation, per the DOJ.

Biden will reverse Trump's attempt to lift COVID-related travel restrictions

Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.

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