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Photo: Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

After parading more of Paul Manafort's extravagant purchases — including lavish suits and "M-shaped" flower gardens — the former Trump campaign chairman's bookkeeper testified that she did not know of any offshore accounts and that financial documents Rick Gates sent to banks in 2015 showed the company making $4 million more than she had accounted for, according to the Washington Post.

The big picture: This is day three of the Manafort's trial, and the money fraud case against him is building.

The details: Judge T.S. Ellis III pushed back against the detailed information described by prosecutors regarding Manafort's purchases saying, "All the evidence of the fancy suits really is irrelevant and besmirches the defendant. Most of us don’t have designer suits, we don’t have pagodas … it engenders some resentment."

  • He added that the point is whether or not Manafort paid taxes on that income, "I might have started there had I been the government, but that’s your choice."

After some doubt yesterday, Rick Gates seems more than likely to testify again. "We have every intention to call him as a witness," one of the prosecutors, Greg Andres, told the judge.

One fun thing: A juror is having a birthday tomorrow, it seems. The jury requested a birthday cake, and Judge Ellis obliged. "You may indeed bring in birthday cake for Friday. I quit having birthdays years ago," he said.

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
21 mins ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.