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A climate march in Brussels. (Photo: Romy Arroyo Fernandez/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Of top 10 global carbon emitters, not a single one is hitting its climate goals as outlined under the Paris Agreement, per data from the Climate Action Tracker.

Why it matters: Even if every country that's adopted the Paris Agreement were to meet their pledges, it would not avert the worst effects of climate change.

Driving the news: June 1 marks the 2-year anniversary of President Trump's announcement that the U.S. would withdraw from the deal. Per the Climate Action Tracker, the U.S., the second-largest world emitter of greenhouse gasses (but top historical emitter), falls under "critically insufficient," the worst category, in meeting its Paris pledge.

The backdrop: The Paris Agreement's main goal is to keep global temperature rise this century to "well below 2ºC," above pre-industrial levels, and pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5ºC.

  • Each country determined what it would be willing to do under the agreement. Such commitments are known as intended nationally determined contributions (INDCs).
  • After ratifying the agreement, the INDC would become the country's first nationally determined contribution.
    • So far, 185 countries have ratified or adopted the Paris Agreement. All of the NDCs are available here.

Details: Climate Action Tracker ranks countries based on "(I)NDCs, 2020 pledges, long-term targets and current policies against whether they are consistent with a country's fair share effort to the Paris Agreement's 1.5ºC temperature goal."

  • There are 6 different categories: critically insufficient, highly insufficient, insufficient, 2ºC compatible, 1.5ºC Paris Agreement compatible and role model.
  • Not all the countries with NDCs appear on the tracker.

Where countries rank: The top 10 emitters are bolded.

  • Role model: None.
  • 1.5ºC Paris Agreement compatible: Morocco, The Gambia
  • 2ºC compatible: Bhutan, Costa Rica, Ethiopia, India, Philippines
  • Insufficient: Australia, Brazil, EU, Kazakhstan, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Switzerland
  • Highly insufficient: Argentina, Canada, Chile, China, Indonesia, Japan, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, UAE
  • Critically insufficient: Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United States, Ukraine

Yes, but: There is no enforcement mechanism under the Paris Agreement to punish a country for missing a target.

Go deeper: Axios' complete coverage of the Paris Agreement.

Go deeper

DOJ watchdog to probe whether officials sought to alter election results

Donald and Melania Trump exit Air Force One in West Palm Beach, Fla., on Jan. 20. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department's inspector general will investigate whether any current or former DOJ officials "engaged in an improper attempt to have DOJ seek to alter the outcome" of the 2020 election, the agency announced Monday.

Driving the news: The investigation comes in the wake of a New York Times report that alleged Jeffrey Clark, the head of DOJ's civil division, had plotted with President Trump to oust acting Attorney General Jeffery Rosen in a scheme to overturn the election results in Georgia.

2 hours ago - Podcasts

Google's chief health officer Karen DeSalvo on vaccinating America

Google on Monday became the latest Big Tech company to get involved with COVID-19 vaccinations. Not just by doing things like incorporating vaccination sites into its maps, but by helping to turn some of its offices and parking lots into vaccination sites.

Axios Re:Cap goes deeper into what Google is doing, and why now, with Dr. Karen DeSalvo, Google's chief health officer who previously worked at HHS and as health commissioner for New Orleans.

Biden signs order overturning Trump's transgender military ban

Photo: Tom Brenner/Getty Images

President Biden signed an executive order on Monday overturning the Trump administration's ban on transgender Americans serving in the military.

Why it matters: The ban, which allowed the military to bar openly transgender recruits and discharge people for not living as their sex assigned at birth, affected up to 15,000 service members, according to tallies from the National Center for Transgender Equality and Transgender American Veterans Association.