Dec 2, 2017

Palestinians want Trump to back away from Jerusalem plan

Trump with Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu. Photo: Sebastian Scheiner / AP

The Palestinian delegation, which met with White House officials last week, said the U.S. would not be accepted by the Palestinian Authority as an honest broker or a mediator with Israel if Trump recognizes Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

Why it matters: Palestinian officials say the members of the delegation told Trump's aides that any move by the President regarding Jerusalem — either moving the U.S. embassy there or recognizing the city as Israel's capital — would kill any possibility for a future peace initiative by Trump.

Palestinian officials say they got no clear answers from the White House regarding the concerns they raised. Trump is expected to give a speech on the matter next Wednesday.

What they're saying: In the last 24 hours the Palestinians have been trying to get the international community to push the Trump administration to refrain from any steps regarding Jerusalem.

  • Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas called the crown prince of Saudi Arabia Mohamed Bin Salman (nicknamed MBS) and asked him to intervene with the U.S. on this issue.
  • MBS has a very close relationship with Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner. According to Palestinian officials, MBS told Abbas that King Salman and him personally see the issue of Jerusalem as a top priority.
  • Palestinian officials say Abbas also called King Abdullah of Jordan, Egyptian President Sisi, French President Macron, President of Turkey Erdogan and the Emirs of Kuwait and Qatar. In all the phone calls Abbas asked his counterparts to press the Trump administration not to take any moves regarding Jerusalem. Abbas's spokesman Nabil Abu-Rudeineh said Abbas told his counterparts that such a move by the U.S. will have dangerous consequences for the whole region.

Go deeper

The mystery of coronavirus superspreaders

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A small percentage of people — called superspreaders — may be responsible for a large number of COVID-19 infections, research is starting to indicate.

Why it matters: While there's no method to detect who these people are before they infect others, there are ways to control behaviors that cause superspreading events — a key issue as states start to reopen and debate what types of events are OK.

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 5,931,112 — Total deaths: 357,929 — Total recoveries — 2,388,172Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 1,711,313 — Total deaths: 101,129 — Total recoveries: 391,508 — Total tested: 15,192,481Map.
  3. States: New York to allow private businesses to deny entry to customers without masks.
  4. Public health: Louisiana Sen. Cassidy wants more frequent testing of nursing home workers.
  5. Congress: Pelosi slams McConnell on stimulus delay — Sen. Tim Kaine and wife test positive for coronavirus antibodies.
  6. Tech: Twitter fact-checks Chinese official's claims that coronavirus originated in U.S.
  7. What should I do? When you can be around others after contracting the coronavirus — Traveling, asthma, dishes, disinfectants and being contagiousMasks, lending books and self-isolatingExercise, laundry, what counts as soap — Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingHow to minimize your risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it, the right mask to wear.

Subscribe to Mike Allen's Axios AM to follow our coronavirus coverage each morning from your inbox.

Updated 32 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Twitter fact-checks Chinese official's claims that coronavirus originated in U.S.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian. Photo: Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter slapped a fact-check label on a pair of months-old tweets from a Chinese government spokesperson that falsely suggested that the coronavirus originated in the U.S. and was brought to Wuhan by the U.S. military, directing users to "get the facts about COVID-19."

Why it matters: The labels were added after criticism that Twitter had fact-checked tweets from President Trump about mail-in voting, but not other false claims from Chinese Communist Party officials and other U.S. adversaries.