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Data: SurveyMonkey online poll; Chart: Harry Stevens/Axios

The majority of relationships today began offline, but online dating is quickly becoming the new normal and losing its stigma.

By the numbers: More than half of Americans who have used dating apps or sites said they had a positive view of online dating and 72% said they think relationships that begin online are just as or more successful than those that begin offline, according to a new Axios/Survey Monkey poll.

"Online dating had this stigma in the early 2000s where it's only losers go online ... but now, it's like, you're a loser if you're not on the sites."
— Stephanie Tong from Wayne State University told Axios
  • Half of LGBQ people polled have a positive view of online dating.
  • But the stigma remains among those who have never used a dating app or site. 65% of them had a negative view of online dating, and almost half said they think relationships are less successful if they begin online.

Between the lines: Despite a widely held assumption, even among 18-34 year olds, that dating apps are for hookups, casual sex was one of the last reasons why people said they downloaded Tinder, according to a recent study. The top reasons were:

  1. Entertainment
  2. Curiosity
  3. Socialize
  4. Love
  5. Ego boost

New game, new rules:

  • Apps like Bumble have attempted to shift gender roles in relationships, but almost half of men surveyed by Axios/Survey Monkey said that they would typically make the first move after matching with someone, compared to just 13% of women.
  • Finding love isn't always a reason to give up the apps. 11% of 18-34 year olds said that they would continue using the apps for entertainment or to find other relationships even while in a relationship.
  • 27% of people in the same age group said that people should stop using the apps only after making a verbal commitment to a relationship with someone — the most popular option.

Go deeper: Our special report on the future of dating

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Biden: The next president should decide on Ginsburg’s replacement

Joe Biden. Photo: Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Joe Biden is calling for the winner of November's presidential election to select Ruth Bader Ginsburg's replacement on the Supreme Court.

What he's saying: "[L]et me be clear: The voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider," Biden said. "This was the position the Republican Senate took in 2016 when there were almost 10 months to go before the election. That's the position the United States Senate must take today, and the election's only 46 days off.

Trump, McConnell to move fast to replace Ginsburg

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump will move within days to nominate his third Supreme Court justice in just three-plus short years — and shape the court for literally decades to come, top Republican sources tell Axios.

Driving the news: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Republicans are ready to move to confirm Trump's nominee before Election Day, just 46 days away, setting up one of the most consequential periods of our lifetimes, the sources say.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 30,393,591 — Total deaths: 950,344— Total recoveries: 20,679,272Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 6,722,699 — Total deaths: 198,484 — Total recoveries: 2,556,465 — Total tests: 92,163,649Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: Massive USPS face mask operation called off The risks of moving too fast on a vaccine.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety netHow the pandemic has deepened Boeing's 737 MAX crunch.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.