Adapted from EPI analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

As is often the case, the staggering losses in the coronavirus-driven recession have been worse for black workers.

By the numbers: According to a report from the Economic Policy Institute, titled "Racism and economic inequality have predisposed black workers to be most hurt by coronavirus pandemic," more than 1 in 6 black workers lost their jobs between February and April.

  • Further, their study finds that as of April, less than half of the adult black population was employed.

The big picture: "While the economic devastation is widespread, as we show in this report, black workers are less able to weather such a storm because they have fewer earners in their families, lower incomes, and lower liquid wealth than white workers," write Valerie Wilson, director of EPI’s program on race, ethnicity and the economy, and senior economist Elise Gould.

Go deeper: America's unfinished business

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PPP was not distributed equally across racial lines

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

There's more evidence that the government’s flagship small business loan program was distributed unequally across racial lines.

Why it matters: Minority-owned companies are faring much worse — and the fate of their businesses is much more bleak — than white-owned ones, as the pandemic slams Main Street.

Pandemic wipes out 5 years of economic growth in 3 months

The economic decline between April and June caused by the coronavirus pandemic brought the U.S. GDP back to levels last seen in 2015, according to data released Thursday.

Why it matters: While we fell into the hole swiftly, economists are dashing hopes of an equally swift recovery. They warn it could take years for the U.S. to recover.

Coronavirus pandemic pushes U.S. economy to worst-ever contraction

Data: Bureau of Economic Analysis; Chart: Axios Visuals

The U.S. economy shrank at an annualized 32.9% rate in the second quarter — the worst-ever contraction on records that date back to 1947, the government said on Thursday.

Why it matters: Widespread lockdowns to contain the spread of the coronavirus pandemic ravaged the economy in a way that's never been seen in modern times, and hope for a swift recovery has been dashed as cases have surged nationwide.