Dec 13, 2017

Omarosa out at White House

Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

The White House stated this morning that Omarosa Manigault resigned as the Director of Communications for the Office of Public Liaison effective January 20, per the AP. Manigault originally rose to public prominence as a contestant on President Trump's former reality show The Apprentice.

Why it matters: While Manigault's departure adds to a string of White House exits at the start of 2018, her behind-the-scenes departure reportedly was not smooth — April Ryan tweeted that Manigault was actually fired by Chief of Staff John Kelly and hurled a string of expletives at him, requiring her to be removed from the White House grounds. That'd be an inauspicious end to an already rocky White House tenure that was mostly notable for its bad press and a lack of clarity surrounding her responsibilities. The Secret Service tweeted Wednesday evening that they were not involved.

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Special report: Health care workers vs. coronavirus

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images, Bruce Bennett/Getty Images, and Europa Press News/Europa Press via Getty Images

Health care workers are at an especially high risk of catching the coronavirus, because of their prolonged exposure to patients who have it. Making matters worse, the U.S. doesn't have enough of the protective equipment, like masks and gloves, that keeps them safe.

  • And yet these workers, with loved ones of their own, keep showing up at hospitals across the country, knowing that more Americans than they can possibly care for are depending on them.
Go deeperArrow19 mins ago - Health

Backed by the Fed, bond investors get bullish

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Fed's massive injections of liquidity have reopened much of the bond market, and after back-to-back weeks in which more than $100 billion flowed out of bond funds, investors have regained their bearings and now see opportunity.

What's happening: But after the hemorrhaging outflows relented last week, bulls may now be sticking their heads out a bit too far. Junk bond funds took in more than $7 billion for the week ended April 1, according to Refinitiv Lipper, setting a new weekly record.

What top CEOs fear telling America about the coronavirus shutdown

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Top CEOs, in private conversations and pleas to President Trump, are warning of economic catastrophe if America doesn't begin planning for a phased return to work as soon as May, corporate leaders tell Axios.

Why it matters: The CEOs say massive numbers of companies, big and small, could go under if business and government don't start urgent talks about ways groups of workers can return.