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The Kaiser Family Foundation is out today with the latest evidence that the repeal threat is making Obamacare more popular: Its monthly tracking poll shows the highest favorable rating the program has had since 2010, the year President Barack Obama signed it into law.

It's not great — just 48 percent, which says a lot about how low the approval ratings were before. But it's clearly higher than the unfavorable ratings for the first time in more than a year. (A Pew Research Center poll yesterday found the same thing, but with a higher approval rating: 54 percent.)

Expand chart
Data: Kaiser Family Foundation Health Tracking Polls; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

A few other highlights:

  • Still evenly divided on repeal: 47 percent say yes, 48 percent say no.
  • More people want a replacement at the same time (28 percent) than want repeal first (18 percent).
  • That's true of Republicans too: 48 percent want repeal-and-replace, 31 percent want repeal first.
  • Don't stiff the Medicaid expansion states: 84 percent say they should keep getting their federal funds.
  • Big majority prefers current Medicaid program (66 percent) to per-capita caps (31 percent).
  • Same with Medicaid block grants: Public prefers current Medicaid program, 63 percent to 32 percent.

The big question: Who are the 16 percent of Republicans who don't want repeal?

Go deeper

Chuck Schumer is now majority leader as 3 new Democratic senators are sworn in

Mitch McConnell (L), Chuck Schumer (R). Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) is officially Senate majority leader after the inauguration of Vice President Kamala Harris and the swearing-in of new Sens. Alex Padilla (D-Calif.), Jon Ossoff (D-Ga.) and Raphael Warnock (D-Ga.).

Why it matters: With a 50-50 Senate, Schumer will control a narrow majority with Harris as the tie-breaking vote. Democratic control of the Senate is crucial to President Biden's agenda, from getting his coronavirus relief proposal passed to forgiving student debt.

46 mins ago - Technology

QAnon faces the music

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Supporters of former President Donald Trump who thought he was about to stop the inauguration, seize power and crush his enemies were left blinking in the sunlight Wednesday as President Biden took the oath of office.

Why it matters: It's an inflection point for anyone who realizes they've been strung along by QAnon and related strands of pro-Trump magical thinking. They could either retreat from conspiracy theories or tumble deeper down the rabbit hole.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden has arrived at the White House and he will sign executive orders and other presidential actions.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

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