Feb 24, 2017

Obamacare just keeps getting more popular (sort of)

The Kaiser Family Foundation is out today with the latest evidence that the repeal threat is making Obamacare more popular: Its monthly tracking poll shows the highest favorable rating the program has had since 2010, the year President Barack Obama signed it into law.

It's not great — just 48 percent, which says a lot about how low the approval ratings were before. But it's clearly higher than the unfavorable ratings for the first time in more than a year. (A Pew Research Center poll yesterday found the same thing, but with a higher approval rating: 54 percent.)

Data: Kaiser Family Foundation Health Tracking Polls; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

A few other highlights:

  • Still evenly divided on repeal: 47 percent say yes, 48 percent say no.
  • More people want a replacement at the same time (28 percent) than want repeal first (18 percent).
  • That's true of Republicans too: 48 percent want repeal-and-replace, 31 percent want repeal first.
  • Don't stiff the Medicaid expansion states: 84 percent say they should keep getting their federal funds.
  • Big majority prefers current Medicaid program (66 percent) to per-capita caps (31 percent).
  • Same with Medicaid block grants: Public prefers current Medicaid program, 63 percent to 32 percent.

The big question: Who are the 16 percent of Republicans who don't want repeal?

Go deeper

Top 4 Democrats statistically neck and neck in Iowa presidential poll

Biden and Warren participate at the sixth Democratic primary debate. Photo: Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders has gained momentum to become the first choice among likely Iowa caucus-goers three weeks before the nation's first presidential contest, while Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg have slowed in the latest poll from The Des Moines Register, Mediacom and CNN.

Why it matters: But taking the margin of error into account, the poll shows the Vermont senator in a statistical dead heat with Warren, Buttigieg and former Vice President Joe Biden.

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Electric vehicles are coming, but no one is sure how fast

Data: Columbia Center on Global Energy Policy; Chart: Axios Visuals

A new study helps to show that experts are all over the map when it comes to gaming out the rise of electric vehicles in the global marketplace.

Why it matters: The speed at which EVs become truly mainstream is one variable affecting the future of oil demand and carbon emissions. Passenger cars account for roughly a fourth of world oil demand.

State and local officials fight to keep Medicaid for inmates

Angola prison in Louisiana. Photo: Giles Clarke/Getty Images

Some local and state officials want Medicaid to start picking up the tab for inmates' health care, Stateline reports.

How it works: Medicaid beneficiaries lose their coverage while they're incarcerated — including pretrial detention for people who can't make bail — and county governments are generally responsible for providing their care.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020