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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

As Election Day gets closer, Joe Biden leads President Trump by sizable margins on the major issues of the day, according to a national poll by The New York Times and Siena College.

Why it matters: With only two weeks to go before election day, there's little time for Trump make up the gap between he and Biden on the issues voters care deeply about. These include a new multi-trillion dollar stimulus program, mandatory mask-wearing, and a $2 trillion renewable energy package. Voters are also now evenly split on who will better manage the economy — a blow to Trump as he's led on the issue for much of the campaign.

By the numbers:

  • Biden is favored over Trump to handle the coronavirus pandemic by 12 points.
  • 51% of those surveyed said the worst of Covid-19 was still to come, but 33% of voters probably wouldn't take a vaccine after it was approved by the F.D.A.
  • 59% of voters support a national mask mandate with about 30% of Republicans saying they would support this policy as a nationwide requirement.
  • 72% of voters sampled, including 56% of Republicans, said they backed the $2 trillion stimulus package that House Democrats have been trying to get approved instead of the "skinny bill" that is currently on the table, in order to increase unemployment insurance and provide financial support local governments.
  • 58% of voters, including 65% of independents, said the Supreme Court should not beyond nine justices, yet voters still prefer Biden over Trump to choose Supreme Court justices by 6 points.
  • 44% percent of voters supported Amy Coney Barrett's nomination and 42% opposed it, while the remainder declined to take a position.
  • 66% of voters also demonstrated support for Biden's $2 trillion renewable energy and infrastructure stimulus package.

The big picture: 50% of voters are backing Biden versus 41% that support Trump and 3% are divided among other candidates. Trump and Biden have very different loyal demographics, yet voters see Biden as more capable of uniting the U.S. by nearly 20 points.

  • Biden is ahead of Trump among female voters by 23 points. 56% of women and 53% of white voters with college degrees said they had a very unfavorable impression Trump.
  • Trump’s efforts to tarnish Biden’s personal image have backfired and hurt him among swing voters. 53% percent of voters said they viewed Biden in favorable terms, while only 43% say the same about Trump.
  • Trump still retains his support among white voters without college degrees, who favor him to Biden by 23 points, yet this is far less than 37 point advantage he held among this group in 2016.

Methodology: The margin of sampling error for the poll, which was conducted from Oct. 15 to 18, was 3.4 percentage points.

Go deeper

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The top Republicans who have acknowledged Biden as president-elect

Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Some elected Republicans are breaking ranks with President Trump to acknowledge that President-elect Biden won the 2020 presidential election.

Why it matters: The relative sparsity of acknowledgements highlights Trump's lasting power in the GOP, as his campaign moves to file multiple lawsuits alleging voter fraud in key swing states — despite the fact that there have been no credible allegations of any widespread fraud anywhere in the U.S.

Biden's dull-by-design plan

Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The most remarkable part of President-elect Biden’s campaign and early picks for positions of true power is the unremarkable — and predictable — nature of his big moves. 

Why it matters: Biden is obsessed with bringing stability and conventional sanity back to governance. "He is approaching this — in part — like an experienced mechanic intent on repairing something that's been badly broken," said one source familiar with the president-elect's thinking.

Nov 23, 2020 - Technology

Biden's openings for tech progress

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images 

Item No. 1 on President-elect Joe Biden's day-one tech agenda, controlling the flood of misinformation online, offers no fast fixes — but other tech issues facing the new administration hold out opportunities for quick action and concrete progress.

What to watch: Closing the digital divide will be a high priority, as the pandemic has exposed how many Americans still lack reliable in-home internet connections and the devices needed to work and learn remotely.